Introducing: Raspberry Pi 5!

Today, we’re delighted to announce the launch of Raspberry Pi 5, coming at the end of October. Priced at $60 for the 4GB variant, and $80 for its 8GB sibling (plus your local taxes), virtually every aspect of the platform has been upgraded, delivering a no-compromises user experience. Raspberry Pi 5 comes with new features, it’s over twice as fast as its predecessor, and it’s the first Raspberry Pi computer to feature silicon designed in‑house here in Cambridge, UK.

A Raspberry Pi 5, photographed corner-on, against a plain grey background.

Key features include:

  • 2.4GHz quad-core 64-bit Arm Cortex-A76 CPU
  • VideoCore VII GPU, supporting OpenGL ES 3.1, Vulkan 1.2
  • Dual 4Kp60 HDMI® display output
  • 4Kp60 HEVC decoder
  • Dual-band 802.11ac Wi-Fi®
  • Bluetooth 5.0 / Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE)
  • High-speed microSD card interface with SDR104 mode support
  • 2 × USB 3.0 ports, supporting simultaneous 5Gbps operation
  • 2 × USB 2.0 ports
  • Gigabit Ethernet, with PoE+ support (requires separate PoE+ HAT, coming soon)
  • 2 × 4-lane MIPI camera/display transceivers
  • PCIe 2.0 x1 interface for fast peripherals
  • Raspberry Pi standard 40-pin GPIO header
  • Real-time clock
  • Power button

In a break from recent tradition, we are announcing Raspberry Pi 5 before the product arrives on shelves. Units are available to pre-order today from many of our Approved Reseller partners, and we expect the first units to ship by the end of October.

Watch Eben do some talking about Raspberry Pi 5

We’re incredibly grateful to the community of makers and hackers who make Raspberry Pi what it is; you’ve been extraordinarily patient throughout the supply chain issues that have made our work so challenging over the last couple of years. We’d like to thank you: we’re going to ringfence all of the Raspberry Pi 5s we sell until at least the end of the year for single-unit sales to individuals, so you get the first bite of the cherry.

We’re also giving every print subscriber to The MagPi and HackSpace magazines a single-use code, giving them priority access to Raspberry Pi 5 hardware. Click those links to learn more about our Priority Boarding programme — and if you subscribe today, you can get your hands on a Priority Boarding pass too.

Between now and the end of October, we’ll be running a series of regular articles and videos, focusing on different aspects of the platform. Keep checking in here.

A little history

Way back in June 2019, we launched Raspberry Pi 4, the first true PC-class Raspberry Pi computer. With a quad-core Arm Cortex-A72 processor clocked at 1.5GHz, it was roughly forty times faster than the original Raspberry Pi model from 2012. In many ways the timing was perfect: in March the following year, schools closed, and millions of schoolchildren around the world were sent to study from home. Tens of thousands of them were able to rely on a Raspberry Pi 4 as their primary PC.

Watch Raspberry Pi 5 show you all of its bits without talking

In the four years since then, Raspberry Pi 4, and its derivatives Raspberry Pi 400 and Compute Module 4, have become firm favourites of enthusiasts, educators, and professional design engineers worldwide. Modern Raspberry Pi 4 computers run 20% faster than the launch variant, with a core clock speed of 1.8GHz. And, despite the well publicised challenges that have affected the electronics supply chain over the last two years, we’ve made and sold over 14 million units of Raspberry Pi 4 in that time.

But time doesn’t stand still, and neither does our community’s appetite for performance. And since 2016 — the era of Raspberry Pi 3 — we’ve been quietly working on a much more radical overhaul of the Raspberry Pi platform. Today, that effort bears fruit, with the launch of Raspberry Pi 5: compared to Raspberry Pi 4, we have between two and three times the CPU and GPU performance; roughly twice the memory and I/O bandwidth; and for the first time we have Raspberry Pi silicon on a flagship Raspberry Pi device.

New platform, new chipset

Three new chips, each designed specifically for the Raspberry Pi 5 program, come together to deliver a step change in performance.

BCM2712

Close-up photo of part of the Raspberry Pi 5 board, centring the metal shield over the BCM2712 chip, with laser etching identifying the chip.

BCM2712 is a new 16-nanometer application processor (AP) from Broadcom, derived from the 28-nanometer BCM2711 AP which powers Raspberry Pi 4, with numerous architectural enhancements. At its heart is a quad-core 64-bit Arm Cortex-A76 processor, clocked at 2.4GHz, with 512KB per-core L2 caches, and a 2MB shared L3 cache. Cortex-A76 is three microarchitectural generations beyond Cortex-A72, and offers both more instructions per clock (IPC) and lower energy per instruction. The combination of a newer core, a higher clock speed, and a smaller process geometry yields a much faster Raspberry Pi, and one that consumes much less power for a given workload.

Our newer, faster CPU is complemented by a newer, faster GPU: Broadcom’s VideoCore VII, developed here in Cambridge, with fully open source Mesa drivers from our friends at Igalia. An updated VideoCore hardware video scaler (HVS) is capable of driving two simultaneous 4Kp60 HDMI displays, up from single 4Kp60 or dual 4Kp30 on Raspberry Pi 4. A 4Kp60 HEVC decoder and a new Image Sensor Pipeline (ISP), both developed at Raspberry Pi, round out the multimedia subsystem. To keep the system supplied with memory bandwidth, we have a 32-bit LPDDR4X SDRAM subsystem, running at 4267MT/s, up from an effective 2000MT/s on Raspberry Pi 4.

RP1

Previous Raspberry Pi generations were built on a monolithic AP architecture: while some peripheral functions were provided by an external device (the Via Labs VL805 USB controller and hub on Raspberry Pi 4, and the Microchip LAN951x and LAN7515 USB hub and Ethernet controller chips on earlier products), substantially all of the I/O functions were integrated into the AP itself. Fairly early in the history of Raspberry Pi, we realised that as we migrated the AP to progressively newer process nodes, this approach would eventually become both technically and economically unsustainable.

Close-up photo of part of the Raspberry Pi 5 board, centring the RP1 chip, on which the Raspberry Pi logo and text identifying the chip are printed

Raspberry Pi 5, in contrast, is built on a disaggregated chiplet architecture. Here, only the major fast digital functions, the SD card interface (for board layout reasons), and the very fastest interfaces (SDRAM, HDMI, and PCI Express) are provided by the AP. All other I/O functions are offloaded to a separate I/O controller, implemented on an older, cheaper process node, and connected to the AP via PCI Express.

RP1 is our I/O controller for Raspberry Pi 5, designed by the same team at Raspberry Pi that delivered the RP2040 microcontroller, and implemented, like RP2040, on TSMC’s mature 40LP process. It provides two USB 3.0 and two USB 2.0 interfaces; a Gigabit Ethernet controller; two four-lane MIPI transceivers for camera and display; analogue video output; 3.3V general-purpose I/O (GPIO); and the usual collection of GPIO-multiplexed low-speed interfaces (UART, SPI, I2C, I2S, and PWM). A four-lane PCI Express 2.0 interface provides a 16Gb/s link back to BCM2712.

Under development since 2016, RP1 is by a good margin the longest-running, most complex, and (at $15 million) most expensive program we’ve ever undertaken here at Raspberry Pi. It has undergone substantial evolution over the years, as our projected requirements have changed: the C0 step used on Raspberry Pi 5 is the third major revision of the silicon. And while its interfaces differ in fine detail from those of BCM2711, they have been designed to be very similar from a functional perspective, ensuring a high degree of compatibility with earlier Raspberry Pi devices.

DA9091

BCM2712 and RP1 are supported by the third new component of the chipset, the Renesas DA9091 “Gilmour” power-management IC (PMIC). This integrates eight separate switch-mode power supplies to generate the various voltages required by the board, including a quad-phase core supply, capable of providing 20 amps of current to power the Cortex-A76 cores and other digital logic in BCM2712.

Close-up photo of part of the Raspberry Pi 5 board, centring the DA9091 power-management IC, on which its name is printed

Like BCM2712, DA9091 is the product of a multi-year co-development effort. Working closely with the Renesas team in Edinburgh allowed us to produce a PMIC which is precisely tuned for our needs. And we were able to squeeze in two frequently requested features: a real-time clock (RTC), which can be powered by an external supercapacitor or a rechargeable lithium-manganese cell; and a PC-style power button, supporting hard and soft power-off and power-on events.

Two other elements of the chipset have been retained from Raspberry Pi 4. The Infineon CYW43455 combo chip provides dual-band 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 5.0 with Bluetooth Low-Energy (BLE); while the chip itself is unchanged, it is provided with a dedicated switched power supply rail for lower power consumption, and is connected to BCM2712 by an upgraded SDIO interface which supports DDR50 mode for higher potential throughput. As before, Ethernet connectivity is provided by a Broadcom BCM54213 Gigabit Ethernet PHY; this now sits at a jaunty 45-degree angle, a first for Raspberry Pi, and a source of enduring disappointment for orthogonal-layout enthusiast and CTO (Software) Gordon Hollingworth.

Form-factor evolution

On the outside, Raspberry Pi 5 closely resembles its predecessors. But, while retaining the overall credit-card-sized footprint, we’ve taken the opportunity to update some elements of the design, to align with the capabilities of the new chipset.

We’ve removed the four-pole composite video and analogue audio jack from the board. Composite video, now generated by RP1, is still available from a pair of 0.1”-spaced pads on the bottom edge of the board.

We now sport a pair of FPC connectors, in the space formerly occupied by the four-pole jack and camera connector. These are four-lane MIPI interfaces, using the same higher-density pinout found on various generations of Compute Module I/O board; and they are bi-directional (transceiver) interfaces, meaning that each one can connect either to a CSI-2 camera or to a DSI display. The space on the left of the board formerly occupied by the display connector now contains a smaller FPC connector which provides a single lane of PCI Express 2.0 connectivity for high-speed peripherals.

Close-up photo of part of the Raspberry Pi 5 board, centring the two FPC connectors, labelled CAM/DISP 0 and CAM/DISP 1

The Gigabit Ethernet jack has returned to its classic position in the bottom right corner of the board, after a brief sojourn in the top right on Raspberry Pi 4. And it’s brought with it the four-pin PoE connector, simplifying the board layout at the cost of a compatibility break with our existing PoE and PoE+ HATs.

Finally, we’ve grown a pair of mounting holes for a heatsink, as well as JST connectors for the RTC battery (two pins), Arm debug and UART (three pins), and fan with PWM control and tacho feedback (four pins).

Designed in Cambridge, manufactured in Wales

Like all flagship Raspberry Pi products, Raspberry Pi 5 is built at the Sony UK Technology Centre in Pencoed, South Wales. We have been working with Sony since the launch of the first Raspberry Pi computer in 2012, and we’re firm believers in the benefits of manufacturing our products within a few hours’ drive of our engineering design centre in Cambridge: a decade of frequent interaction with the Sony team has helped us understand how to design products that can be built reliably, cheaply, and at massive scale.

Close-up photo of a corner of the Raspberry Pi 5 box, centred on a Welsh flag icon (red dragon rampant on a grey field against a white sky) beside the words "Made in the UK".

Raspberry Pi 5 marks the introduction of a number of manufacturing innovations. One of these is intrusive reflow for connectors, which improves the mechanical quality of the product, increases throughput, and eliminates the costly and energy-intensive selective- or wave-solder process from the production flow. Others include fully routed panel singulation for cleaner board edges, and a new approach to production test inspired by our experiences testing our RP2040 microcontroller at scale.

Accessories, accessories, accessories

Every new flagship Raspberry Pi product is accompanied by new accessories, and Raspberry Pi 5 is no exception. Layout changes, new interfaces, and much higher peak performance (and a smaller increase in peak power consumption) have led us to redesign some existing accessories, and to develop some entirely new ones.

Case

The updated case for Raspberry Pi 5, priced at $10, builds on the aesthetic of its Raspberry Pi 4 predecessor, but adds a host of new usability and thermal-management features.

An integrated 2.79 (max) CFM fan, with fluid dynamic bearings selected for low noise and an extended operating lifetime, connects to the four-pin JST connector on Raspberry Pi 5 to provide temperature‑controlled cooling. Air is drawn in through a 360‑degree slot under the lid, blown over a heatsink attached to the BCM2712 AP, and exhausted through connector apertures and vents in the base.

The Raspberry Pi Case for Raspberry Pi 5, showing its red base, the fan assembly with a white frame floating above it, and the white lid floating above that

We’ve lengthened the case, and tweaked the retention features, to make it possible to insert the Raspberry Pi 5 board without removing the SD card. And by removing the top of the case, it is now possible to stack multiple cases, as well as to mount HATs on top of the fan, using spacers and GPIO header extensions.

Like all our plastic products, the new case is manufactured by our friends at T-Zero, in the West Midlands, UK.

Active Cooler

Raspberry Pi 5 has been designed to handle typical client workloads, uncased, with no active cooling. Users who wish to use the board uncased under continuous heavy load, without throttling, have the option of adding a $5 Active Cooler. This attaches to the board via two new mounting holes, and connects to the same four-pin JST connector as the case fan.

The Raspberry Pi Active Cooler mounted on a Raspberry Pi 5. The blower, heatsink, and wires connecting to the Raspberry Pi's four-pin JST connector are visible.

A radial blower, again selected for low noise and extended operating lifetime, pushes air through an extruded and milled aluminium heatsink. Both the case and the Active Cooler are able to keep Raspberry Pi 5 well below the thermal throttle point for typical ambient temperatures and worst-case loads. The cooling performance of the Active Cooler is somewhat superior, making it particularly suitable for overclockers.

27W USB-C Power Supply

Raspberry Pi 5 consumes significantly less power, and runs significantly cooler, than Raspberry Pi 4 when running an identical workload. However, the much higher performance ceiling means that for the most intensive workloads, and in particular for pathological “power virus” workloads, peak power consumption increases to around 12W, versus 8W for Raspberry Pi 4.

When using a standard 5V, 3A (15W) USB-C power adapter with Raspberry Pi 5, by default we must limit downstream USB current to 600mA to ensure that we have sufficient margin to support these workloads. This is lower than the 1.2A limit on Raspberry Pi 4, though generally still sufficient to drive mice, keyboards, and other low‑power peripherals.

The white 3-pin UK variant of the new Raspberry Pi 27W USB-C Power Supply, pictured with the cable tightly wrapped with a cable tie and the pins facing towards the viewer

For users who wish to drive high-power peripherals like hard drives and SSDs while retaining margin for peak workloads, we are offering a $12 USB-C power adapter which supports a 5V, 5A (25W) operating mode. If the Raspberry Pi 5 firmware detects this supply, it increases the USB current limit to 1.6A, providing 5W of extra power for downstream USB devices and 5W of extra on-board power budget: a boon for those of you who want to experiment with overclocking your Raspberry Pi 5.

It should be noted that users have the option to override the current limit, specifying the higher value even when using a 3A adapter. In our testing, we have found that in this mode Raspberry Pi 5 functions perfectly well with typical configurations of higher-power USB devices, and all but the most pathological workloads.

Camera and display cables

The new, higher-density pinout of the MIPI connectors means that an adapter is required to connect our own cameras and displays, and third-party products, to Raspberry Pi 5.

To support existing camera and display owners, we are offering FPC camera and display cables, which convert from the higher-density format (now referred to as “mini”) to the older lower-density format (now referred to as “standard”). These cables are available in 200mm, 300mm, and 500mm lengths, priced at $1, $2, and $3 respectively.

Two orange cables crossed at one far end lying flat on a plain grey background. White writing on the each cable says "Raspberry Pi Display Cable Standard Mini 200mm" with a Raspberry Pi logo in white and other legal safety logos in white

Camera Module 3, the High-Quality Camera, the Global Shutter Camera, and the Touchscreen Display will all ship with both a standard-to-standard and a 200mm mini-to-standard cable.

PoE+ HAT

From early 2024, we will be offering a new PoE+ HAT. This supports the new location for the four-pin PoE header, and has an L-shaped form factor which allows it to sit inside the Raspberry Pi 5 case without interfering mechanically or disrupting airflow.

A visibly hand-soldered prototype of the L-shaped Raspberry Pi PoE+ HAT for Raspberry Pi 5
Prototype PoE+ HAT. We don’t know yet what the production version will look like, but we do know that it won’t look like this.

The new PoE+ HAT integrates a planar transformer into the PCB layout, and utilises an optimised flyback converter architecture to sustain high efficiency across the whole zero to 25W range of output powers.

M.2 HATs

One of the most exciting additions to the Raspberry Pi 5 feature set is the single-lane PCI Express 2.0 interface. Intended to support fast peripherals, it is exposed on a 16-pin, 0.5mm pitch FPC connector on the left-hand side of the board.

From early 2024, we will be offering a pair of mechanical adapter boards which convert between this connector and a subset of the M.2 standard, allowing users to attach NVMe SSDs and other M.2-format accessories. The first, which conforms to the standard HAT form factor, is intended for mounting larger devices. The second, which shares the L-shaped form factor of the new PoE+ HAT, supports mounting 2230- and 2242-format devices inside the Raspberry Pi 5 case.

Prototype of the larger (standard HAT form factor) M.2 HAT, mounted on a Raspberry Pi 5
Prototype M.2 HAT. Final hardware will not look like this.

Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Guide, 5th Edition

Sporting a brand-new look and feel, and priced at RRP £19.99 ($24.99), this new edition of our bestselling Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Guide is the definitive manual for Raspberry Pi computers and accessories. It has been comprehensively updated to cover Raspberry Pi 5, and the upcoming release of Raspberry Pi OS based on Debian Bookworm.

RTC battery

RTC coin cell connected by red and black jumper wires to a two-pin JST plug

Last, but very much not least, we have sourced a Panasonic lithium manganese rechargeable coin cell, with a pre-fitted two-pin JST plug and an adhesive mounting pad. This is priced at $5, and is suitable for powering the Raspberry Pi 5 real-time clock (RTC) when the main power supply is disconnected.

A newer, better Raspberry Pi OS

In parallel with the final stages of the Raspberry Pi 5 programme, our software team has been busy developing a new version of Raspberry Pi OS, the official first-party operating system for Raspberry Pi devices. This is based on the most recent release of Debian (and its derivative Raspbian), codenamed “Bookworm”, and incorporates numerous enhancements, notably the transition from X11 to the Wayfire Wayland compositor on Raspberry Pi 4 and 5.

Raspberry Pi OS will launch in mid-October, and will be the sole supported first-party operating system for Raspberry Pi 5. Keep checking back here: we’ll be telling you some more about the new OS, and you’ll be able to download it shortly before Raspberry Pi 5 arrives on the shelves in late October.

Credits

Bringing Raspberry Pi 5 to life has been a seven-year, $25 million endeavour, involving tens of organisations and hundreds of individuals. A non-exhaustive list of those who have contributed to Raspberry Pi 5, and its constituent silicon programs, can be found below — just click to expand it.

A credits list for Raspberry Pi 5

We’d like to thank everybody who has contributed to Raspberry Pi 5. It’s been an enormous, lengthy project, and you’ve been a wonderful team to work with. Inevitably, when building a list this long, we accidentally omit people: if you’ve been missed off the list, please email us. You know where to find us!

James Adams, Cyrus Afghahi, Snehil Agrawal, Sam Alder, Alasdair Allan, Kevin Allen, Kiarash Amiri, James Anderson, Andrew Anderson, Neil Bailey, Tarek Bairakdar, Scott Baker, Isuvetha Balendra, Giles Ballard, Kris Baxter, Jeff Beach, David Bell, Jonathan Bell, Oguz Benderli, Benjamin Benson, Paul Bentley, Rick Berard, Doug Berger, Suneel Bharadwaj, Sandeep Bhatia, Shawn Bhatiani, Geoff Blackman, Ed Bleich, Alina Borlan, Chris Boross, Wayne Bortman, Richard Boult, James Boyce, Jamie Brogan-Shaw, Robert Brownhill, Mike Buffham, Efim Bukovsky, Andre Burani, Andrew Burge, Simon Burgess, Kevin Campbell, Thierry Canaud, Amy Carter, Jose María Casanova, Jen-Ming Chai, Swetha Challawar, Louis Chan, Shu Chan, Keyu Chang, Nick Chase, Melvin Cheah, Sherman Chen, Wei Chen, Bonnie Chen, Kuanghui Cheng, Chun Fai Cheung, Toon Tun Chiam, Mark Childs, Jae Cho, Chye Yaw Chong, Kevin Choung, Anne-Marie Christie, David Christie, Scott Clark, Dominic Cobley, Nate Contino, Ben Cook, Stephen Cook, Sheena Coote, John Cowan-Hughes, John Cox, Richard Croad, Darryl Cross, Tom Davies, Shijun Deng, Todd DeRego, Nicola Early, Philip Elwell, Dave Emett, Dan English, Mark Evens, Benjamin Everard, Andras Ferencz, Nick Francis, Liam Fraser, Alexander Fuessel, Nachiket Galgali, Eric Gastelum, Jan Gatermann, Monica Gemeneanu, Valeria Germini, Deven Ghelani, Sharna Ghosh, Ben Giese, Doug Giles, Tracey Glover, Andrew Goros, Timothy Gover, Ron Green, Peter Green, Simon Greening, Andrew Gregory, Glen Grover, Charlotte Hallworth, Paul Hammond, Lauren Hancock, Peter Harper, Lisa Harris, Lucy Hattersley, Xiaocheng He, Amanda Henderson, David Henly, Jason Herrick, Leon Hesch, Darren Hill, Nicholas Hollinghurst, Gordon Hollingworth, Andrew Holme, Michael Howells, Andrew Hsu, Wanchen Hsu, Chi-Yuan Hsu, Mingyuan Huang, Tim Hughes, James Hughes, Andy Hulbert, Rami Husni, James Hutchinson, Lee Huynh, Lee Huynh, Steven Hwang, Leane Ickes, Paul Ittoopunny, Bruno Izern, Chris Jacobs, Olivier Jacquemart, Anurag Jain, Geraint James, Sri Jandhyala, Chris Jaszczur, Dinesh Jayabharathi, Brian Jepson, Dave John, Antonia Johnson, Richard Jones, Lily Jones, Lijo Jose, Tammy Julyan, Nejat Kamaci, Jarkko Karjalainen, Gary Keall, Kevin Kelly, Bruce Kent, Ian Kersley, Gerard Khoo, Megan Kiddy, Chris Kim, Chhavi Kishore, Keith Klingler, Srivarada Kota, Vijay Anantha Krishnan, Y Ravi Chandra Kumar, Eldhose Kurian, Wayne Kusumo, Ramki Lakshman, Koen Lampaert, Anthony Le, Hungchi Lee, Seong Ho Lee, William Lee, Joon Lee, David Lee, Graeme Leese, David Lewsey, Danyu Li, Jay Li, Sherman Li, Dan Li, Tatiane Dias de Lima, Sam Liu, Xiaogang Liu, Simon Long, Patrick Loo, Vasco Lopes, Melissa Lovato, Joshua Low, Jeremy Low, Chris Lowder, Yoana Lozano, Janice Lu, Mihai Lupu, Jeff Lussier, Helen Lynn, Jun Ma, Ian Macaulay, Terry Mackown, Christopher Mairs, Oren Mamet, Tim Mamtora, Sorin-Alexandru Mare, Christopher Martin, Simon Martin, Wasim Master, Jonathan Matthews, Andrea Mauri, Glen McDonnell, Nellie McKesson, Craig McNaughton, Steven Mcninch, Ingrid Megarademy, James Mills, Vassil Mitov, Danny Miyabe, Ali Syed Mohammed, Shawn Molavi, Mircea Moldovan, Marta Momotko, Daniel Moran, Alan Morgan, Anthony Morton, Paul Mucur, Aram Nahidipour, Eng Yee Ng, Thomas Nguyen, Ut Nguyen, Mirela Nicolescu, Keri Norris, Rhian Norris, Rose Nott, Brian O Halloran, Yong Oh, Kenneth Okolo, Eng Choon Ooi, Emma Ormond, Shujuan Pan, Yuan Pang, Ravi Papineni, Simon Parish, Sara Parodi, Chris Pasqualino, Naushirwan Patuck, Davin Phenix, Rui Pimenta, Alejandro Piñeiro, David Plowman, Dominic Plunkett, Lloyd Porter, Neil Price, Jim Quinlan, Nutan Raj, Siva Rajagopalan, Karthik Rajendran, Ashwin Rao, Chaitanya Ray, Haifa Redissi, Justin Rees, Ravi Revanakara, Matt Richardson, Dan Riiff, Maxime Ripard, Peter de Rivaz, Steven Roberts, Toby Roberts, Landis Rogers, Paul Rolfe, Marcelo Romero, Sarah Roth, Matt Rowley, Andy Ruan, Benjamin Ryu, Dave Saarinen, Ali Salem, Akshaye Sama, Suzie Sanders, Graham Sanderson, Aniruddha Sane, Subramaniam Sankaralingam, Muthia Muthiah Sarandoss, Santosh Savekar, Andrew Scheller, Serge Schneider, Graham Scott, Gareth Scourfield, Saran Kumar Seethapathi, Vinaya Lakshmi Puthur Sekar, Saumeet Shah, Sharkus, Ammar Sheikh, Shashank Shekhar, Joe Sheppard, Bhaskar Sherigar, Paul Sherry, Guang-Ting Shin, Jawaid Siddiqi, Amit Paul Singh, Hannah Slater, Ross Smith, Paul Smith, Graham Smith, Kieran Snow, Samantha Snyder, Thomas Spurden, Hosahalli Srinivas, Ajay Srivastava, Tim Stenning, Ben Stephens, David Stevenson, Michael Stimson, Chee Siong Su, Austin Su, Juan Suárez, Bhushan Subbarao, Chris Szczuka, Raymond Szkornik, Jeffrey Tang, Salene Tarling, Raju Tatte, Thian Fatt Tay, Fred Taylor, Robert Thomas, Matthew Thomas, Dan Thompsett, Roger Thornton, Darren Tilley, Chris Tomlinson, Anand Tongle, Iago Toral, Duke Tran, Jim Tseng, Steven Tseng, Richard Tuck, Utku Turker, David Turner, Natalie Turner, Agalgave Umesh, Rachit Upreti, Liz Upton, Manoj Vajhallya, Sandeep Venkatadas, Sushil Verghese, William Vinnicombe, Marco Vrouwe, John Wadsworth, Paul Wallace, Yongbing Wan, Irene Wang, Benjamin Waters, Longyin Wei, Melissa Wen, Simon West, Thomas Westcott, Joe Whaley, Ray Whitley, Ashley Whittaker, Oli Wilkin, Charlotte Williams, Jack Willis, Anthony Wong, Luke Wren, David Wright, David Wu, Romona Wu, Sheldon Wu, Xin Xie, Huajun Xiong, Zheng Xu, Jian Xu, Jason Young, Johnny Yang, Adrian Yu, Chi-Li Yu, Sylvia Yu, Yingdong Yu, Vladimir Zabezhinsky, Angelina Zamora, Kaibin Zhang, Wei Zhang, Jean Zhou, Rob Zwetsloot

686 comments
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Max avatar

Congratulations on the new Pi 5 – this is an awesome step for Raspberry Pi and the world of computing in general!

Reply to Max

Liz Upton avatar

Thanks Max! (Trust you to get the first comment in!)

Reply to Liz Upton

Matthew Roberts avatar

What are the J7 VID holes for on the raspberry Pi 5? may need to know for my setup.

Reply to Matthew Roberts

Matthew Roberts avatar

What are the J7 VID pin holes for between the mini HDMI and the MIPI camera/display plug on the Raspberry Pi 5?

Reply to Matthew Roberts

Liz Upton avatar

That’s for users to solder down a pad to connect composite video out.

Reply to Liz Upton

Jim avatar

Can the M.2 interface be used to boot of an SSD instead of the SD card?

Reply to Jim

Danny Pontbriand avatar

Of course why not. Your choice of in the worst case you can use sdcard to route booting to ssd.

Reply to Danny Pontbriand

Daniël van den Akker avatar

Congratulations on another marvelous product! I am really curious what everybody will make with the PCIe extension! Keep up the good work!!
Kind regards,
Daniël

Reply to Daniël van den Akker

philden avatar

Hi!
it Would be very nice to be able to boot from an mvne SSD…

Reply to philden

Dewey D Freeman avatar

aleady can b done

Reply to Dewey D Freeman

Ron Williams avatar

Dear philden,
Pi and Chips.
In answer to your query concerning the Pi 5 and M.2 chips.
I have been booting, and running my Pi 4 on an M.2 SATA chip for quite sometime now. I also have another M.2 set aside, ready for when my Pi 5 arrives.
Stay safe and my kind regards,
Ron Williams.

Reply to Ron Williams

Goran Jordanov avatar

Hello Ron,
What Pi-hat are you using on the Rapi4 to install a M2 drive and boot from it ? Thx

Reply to Goran Jordanov

Alan McCullagh avatar

Félicitations et bravo to all the team from over here in France. Wonderful news and product – another huge step up/leap forward! Welcome to the family number 5.

Reply to Alan McCullagh

Liz Upton avatar

Bisous! xx

Reply to Liz Upton

JulianG avatar

I was expecting RPI5 news since starting 2023 , and now they delivered a lot of what we were expecting, it will be amazing.
Congratulations to the whole community from Argentina.

Reply to JulianG

Joe avatar

YES, a real time clock. I hope we will be able to buy them. Unlike the RP4.

Reply to Joe

Rogier Kerstens avatar

Congrats on this marvelous new product!

Reply to Rogier Kerstens

dave c avatar

looking forward to another generation of low power hardware hacking and projects!

Reply to dave c

KunYi avatar

Sound Great! want know more detail about RP1 I/O controller

Reply to KunYi

Liz Upton avatar

We’re going to be publishing a lot of content about all the new features – keep watching this space!

Reply to Liz Upton

Leepspvideo avatar

Great work by all involved. The performance is great.

Reply to Leepspvideo

Karagir avatar

Congralution!!
Another right step forward in the journey of RPi.
Dying to know more about audio capabilities. Will it be only through the I2S port? Will HDMI port support ARC/ eARC?
Thanks and congralutions again!!

Reply to Karagir

Mike avatar

How about a Pi Zero update? It’s badly needed.

Reply to Mike

Alasdair Allan avatar

We did that? The Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W launched back in 2021.

Reply to Alasdair Allan

PhilE avatar

Thanks, Mike! I won the sweepstake on how many comments it would take for somebody to whinge about something completely off-topic. Read the room – today is not the day.

Reply to PhilE

Pat avatar

The problem is, you don’t listen to your customers. You’re are manufacturing PIs for the commercial market listening to their demands. You claim and $80 device which will more than likely be sold out for years to come and if you can get one, the price will be north of $200. Hard pass for me and I’m sure others.

Reply to Pat

Liz Upton avatar

Can we hold off on the predictions about how awful everything is going to be until people have actually bought one?

Reply to Liz Upton

Tap avatar

The point Pat is making is that it’s nearly impossible for *people* to buy one. They all get sold to corporations.

D Smith avatar

It will be interesting to see just how close to reality your £200 prediction comes. Would be lovely if it really turned out to be £80 and if supply didn’t create a real black market. I see a real hunger for the Pi 5 and designing it is only the first step, but to market in demand volumes at £80 !! now that is a ‘Muskarian’ challenge that has bedeviled the Pi team since the very first little gem that graced my desk.
But whatever happens – well done to the Pi Team – we love you…

Reply to D Smith

Liz Upton avatar

<3

Michael avatar

As a regular guy living in the States, I can attest to receiving my Pi 5 at the advertised price (as of 10/28). A new subscription to HackSpace magazine didn’t hurt. Still putting it through its paces, but so far so good. It’s a great little machine. Congrats to the Raspberry Pi team!

Reply to Michael

cuanyu avatar

So where is CM 5 :P

Reply to cuanyu

Mladen Bruck avatar

Yeah, that would be a hit for the industry. I’m for example very interested in having an extension for CM5 with a full PCI express slot…

Reply to Mladen Bruck

Paul Dyke avatar

Stunning! Congratulations to the whole team for this amazing new chapter in the Raspberry Pi story!

Reply to Paul Dyke

crumble avatar

AES sounds great. But I think that the layout of the system is strange.

You need a cooler, if you need the full computing power. But in most of such cases fast storage as well. So you have to place a HAT on top of the active cooler.

Can you provide us a road map for a compute version? Or a case with heat pipes?

Reply to crumble

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

Considering it’s impossible to get it to overheat (i.e. throttle) with either the active cooler or the Pi 5 case (which has a fan) I think cooling pipes is a bit of an overkill!

There’s no advantage to having a temperature less than 80 degrees, it doesn’t make the chip faster or slower, it doesn’t shorten its life or anything else…

But if you’d like to spend loads of money cooling it sub-zero fill yer boots!

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

D Smith avatar

Come on now Gordon, some folk just live to ‘plumb up’ their wanabe ‘Smoking Hairy Golfball’ – now 25 watts, that’s real power for them to get their evaporators into. Interesting tho that you say that operating at 80 is perfectly OK (would that be degrees A, F or C?).. If it is C then that is a nice gradient for effective room temperature cooling to be effective. I hadn’t realised the Pi could run so hot.

Reply to D Smith

CooliPi avatar

There is. SD card lifespan. Account for the local heating of the SD card under heavy operation. And you are at 90˚C
Re: chilling to sub zero – yes, we have tried LN2

Reply to CooliPi

PeterB avatar

How exciting. Many thanks for your countless hours and day working on this. Can’t wait for the end of October now.

Reply to PeterB

JanW avatar

Why is Eben Upton not on the Raspberry Pi 5 credits list?

Reply to JanW

Liz Upton avatar

Because he wrote it!

Reply to Liz Upton

ellip avatar

Great comment, Liz!
My laugh of the day.

Reply to ellip

Adam Burns avatar

Does the RPi5 provide data lines to the power socket & does the RP1 IO chip provide compatibility with both host and peripheral mode to support Linux USB Gadgets?

Reply to Adam Burns

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

The USB-C connector has the same dwc-otg interface capability as Pi 4. It will also go into rpiboot mode if you hold down the power button when you power it.

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

Ryan avatar

Does the DWC-OTG utilize DWC2 or DWC3?

Reply to Ryan

Pete avatar

I am also interested whether or not the USB controller will be compatible with the Linux DWC3 driver: https://github.com/torvalds/linux/tree/master/drivers/usb/dwc3 . I have a gadget driver written for DWC3 that I would love to be able to run on a Pi, especially one in the same form factor as the Zero 2 W (Zero 3 W?). Thanks.

Reply to Pete

Adam Burns avatar

Gordon, thank you for the confirmation.
Congratulations on the RP1 & thank you for the attention to detail in maintaining this functionality moving forward.

Reply to Adam Burns

Romilly Cocking avatar

Fantastic! I’ll be pre-ordering through my MagPi sub. And if Alasdair Allan has worked on the docs they will be excellent. The specs are great and I’m wondering if we’ll see some GPU AI acceleration software based on the Vulkan 1.2 interface. That could be yet another game changer.

Reply to Romilly Cocking

PhilE avatar

Please refrain from saying nice things about Alisdair, or he’ll be even more unbearable.

Reply to PhilE

Alasdair Allan avatar

Thanks Phil! 😂🤣

Reply to Alasdair Allan

Romilly Cocking avatar

That’s not a problem for me, as I don’t have to work with him :)

Reply to Romilly Cocking

Marco avatar

I find the price in the UK absolutely disgusting. $80 =£65.93 however if I go to the local outlets its £78.90 considering its made just up the road from Devon where I live I really wish you could justify this expense :( especially since the UK is in a massive cost of living crisis!

Reply to Marco

Taylor avatar

Yeah, it’s disappointing that the price has been almost doubled from the Pi4, but contrary to popular belief, Pis aren’t absolutely necessary to sustain human life. But if you do need one, there’s always the Pi 4.

Reply to Taylor

Emmanuel avatar

I will pre-order as soon as possible (already get notificated by swiss store) Idc wether the price wil be CHF 90.00 or CHF 130.00. I love this new RPI5!
I own 3 RPI 4b (4gig) , 1 RPI 400,1 RPI 3b and 1 RPI 2b…1 RPI 4b is a PC with Ubuntu LTS and 1 RPI 4b is a Pi-Hole…I will replace 4b PC with RPI5 and make an openWRT with the 4b….I will order RPI5 8 GB…I can’t await! 2 Monitors with 165Hz are possible to run and faster LAN Speed + nvme….Awesome !!!

Reply to Emmanuel

Helen Lynn avatar

As ever, the prices we quote don’t include local taxes and shipping costs: they can’t, because those costs vary widely depending on where you are. Here in the UK, with VAT at 20%, that £65.93 turns into £79.12, so it looks as though you’re finding it at a whisker under what one might expect.

Reply to Helen Lynn

MW avatar

Thank you, it is a shame after a decade that people get angry at pricing, when RPL have no control over taxes, exchange rates and shipping and are therefore totally blameless.

Reply to MW

anders avatar

You are quoting the 8GB price, the 4GB is much cheaper and maybe there will be a cheaper 2GB in future.

It’s much cheaper than comparable other products.

Reply to anders

MW avatar

It clearly shows in the released pictures of the board that 1GB, 2GB, 4GB and 8GB variants are planned, so the $35 price point will be maintained.

Reply to MW

Jamie Whitehorn avatar

Marco, blame the government for this one, specifically VAT.
$80 will be without tax, I believe.
$80 =£65.93 * 20% VAT = £79.12

Reply to Jamie Whitehorn

Magnus Hammarström avatar

Here in Sweden VAT are 25%

Reply to Magnus Hammarström

Marco avatar

“I think you’re missing my point here. Why am I paying 20% more for a product that is made locally to me than someone living in the United States? That means that even after shipping and importing, it costs less to buy the product from another country. And yes, I did not even discuss taxes on top of that. I know the local school that my kids attend will not be able to justify a purchase like this, and one of the main points for this product was to put a computer in front of every child at the cost of pocket money. It is certainly why I got into RPi back in 2011. I’ve personally not been able to afford a Raspberry Pi since the RPi 2 in 2014, and at the rate the price is increasing, it’s now unfeasible to ever do so.”

Reply to Marco

Liz Upton avatar

Hold onto something while you read this: I think it may come as a bit of a shock. Countries outside the UK also have sales taxes.

Reply to Liz Upton

Marco avatar

Again. Not talking about tax

Reply to Marco

Pat avatar

Lol gotta love this. You can’t reply to your comment after Liz posted last.

Liz Upton avatar

Actually a nesting thing – we don’t nest comments in perpetuity, or things round here would get a bit hard to read.

W. H. Heydt avatar

Varies a lot… In the US, many states–but not all–have sales tax. As a result, prices in the US are quoted pre-tax.

Reply to W. H. Heydt

Liz Upton avatar

I know! I’m a big fan of shopping for frocks in Oregon. (The point still stands, though.)

Marco avatar

Yes, I see my error. I forget the states do not tack on their tax before sale. But still £80 is really high for children to buy. again swing back to Rpi2011 that was manageable for low income families and kids. I just feel that after the success of the Rpi2040 and how it undercut many MCUs at the time of release that this would be doing the same.

Anders avatar

Marco, the $80 is for the 8GB one, this is the top spec – this is just $5 more than the Pi 4 8GB for something more versatile. with more than double the compute power. It’s also cheap compared to other comparable products.

You can see the jumper points on the board for 1 and 2GB variants, so expect even cheaper ones to be available.

N.Venkatesh avatar

Greetings!!
It’s great effort to come up with a new product. Congratulations for that. Can you not lobby with the government to waive off taxes for educational purposes? RP is mostly used by students and researchers around the world to enhance their coding skills.
The government should seriously consider waiver of taxes.

Reply to N.Venkatesh

Carlos Luna avatar

Pi2 was 35$ (plus taxes an whatever). Pi3B was 35$ (plus taxes and whatever). Pi4B 1gb is 35$ (plus taxes and whatever). In fact, Pi4B 2gb was temporarily priced at 35$ (plus taxes and whatever). So a Pi4B 1gb is as affordable as a Pi2 was back when it was launched. Of course, if you want the “high end” version (8gb), then you’ll have to pay extra, but that’s houldn’t surprise anyone.

Reply to Carlos Luna

Jonathan Bennett avatar

There’s some great stuff here! Love seeing the broken out PCIe lane. It would be outstanding to manage to keep some GPIO pins fully available with the m.2 HAT, and even more so with the PoE hat. Looking forward to getting my hands on one of these!

Reply to Jonathan Bennett

Victor Wachanga avatar

This is exciting news. I recently started learning python and can’t wait to have one of these. I want to delve into automation and robotics…

Reply to Victor Wachanga

Silviu Bunea avatar

“It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas” :D

Reply to Silviu Bunea

Taylor avatar

Just thinking, is this the first time that a Pi has launched at a price >$35?

Reply to Taylor

Ben avatar

Only because they haven’t yet launched the 1GB and 2GB models :-)

Reply to Ben

Gordon77 avatar

Great news. Well done, looks an impressive upgrade.

Reply to Gordon77

Eric_S avatar

An amazing achievment!
I have a question:
– What is the specification of the new GPU? (raw FLOPS and real world performance vs the old one)

Reply to Eric_S

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

PI 4 was 4.4 GFLOPS
Pi 5 over 10

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

Eric_S avatar

*Tips hat*
Thanks!

Reply to Eric_S

QwertyChouskie avatar

Would love to see some SuperTuxKart benchmarks on the shiny new GPU hardware at various graphics levels ;)

Reply to QwertyChouskie

Asher Klein avatar

absolutely amazing. Can’t wait to see what some folk are gonna make with pi5

Reply to Asher Klein

Eric Olson avatar

The Pi 4 achieves from 10 to 13 GFlops on the high-performance linpack benchmark HPL, which is used industry wide to measure such things. Judging from other Cortex-A76 based systems, I’d expect 25 to 35 GFlops on the HPL for the new Pi 5.

Reply to Eric Olson

Anders avatar

Great choices to make the full wish list available by options hats whilst improving the core features. Price maintained l, excellent work.

Reply to Anders

Roger Hardiman avatar

Any changes on Video Encoding, eg adding H265 (HEVC) or AV1 encoding?

Reply to Roger Hardiman

Rob Zwetsloot avatar

It’s hardware H265 decoding and VC1 on the chip

Reply to Rob Zwetsloot

Jamie Whitehorn avatar
Gordon Hollingworth avatar

Actually only 4kp60 H265 (HEVC) decode is available
But it only uses 50% of the processors to do 1080p60 on YouTube

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

drich avatar

No realtime video encoding so ?

Reply to drich

Jamie avatar

H264 hardware decoding has been removed?

Reply to Jamie

Liz Upton avatar

Gordon’s been talking about this elsewhere in the comments – scroll through for more!

Reply to Liz Upton

Jamie avatar

I only see discussions on encoding

Yannick avatar

VC1 is different than AV1 though right? what about AV1 decoding?

Reply to Yannick

Liz Upton avatar

We can decode AV1. It won’t do 4k, but it should do 1080p.

Reply to Liz Upton

Sanjin Ganić avatar

Why again using non-standard video outputs? I’d rather have one standard HDMI output than those 2, requiring you to have adapter with me wherever I move Pi …

Reply to Sanjin Ganić

aBUGSworstnightmare avatar
Sanjin Ganić avatar

Yes, it is, we find it on all TV’s, monitors, cameras, displays … If something is industry standard, it doesn’t mean it is a consumer standard ;)

Reply to Sanjin Ganić

PhilE avatar

If you look at the board you’ll see that it fits two micro-HDMIs, the HDMI logo and the new UART socket (my favourite feature) into the space occupied by one full-size HDMI socket. The Pi 5 is even more of a real computer than Pi 4 was, and running the desktop across two monitors is something worth trying.

Reply to PhilE

Sanjin Ganić avatar

Sorry, but it seems like you didn’t get the point. Let me rephrase – Why would I need to always carry mHDMI adapter with my Pi? One full HDMI + mHDMI would be a perfect solution. I am aware of space constraints, but I expected RPI team will find a way and make Pi5 more “consumer friendly”. On Pi4, I mitigated that “mistake” by buying Argon One case, which allows me to use it as a small portable computer compatible with all displays without without worry about any adapter cables.

Reply to Sanjin Ganić

PhilE avatar

What you call an adaptor cable I call a cable. The only disadvantage of having full-sized HDMI on end and micro-HDMI on the other is that you have to get it the right way round, but most people seem to manage. And it’s smaller, which may be a disadvantage if you have a thing for chunky connectors.

Reply to PhilE

Ben Pietras avatar

So, the Pi4 already moved away from full hdmi ports… but you were expecting the Pi5 to move back?
Micro hdmi is tiny and does a great job. Kind of the point of a Raspberry Pi..

Reply to Ben Pietras

Sanjin Ganić avatar

Sure! If product is intended for consumer market (and Pi4/Pi5 are targeting exactly that – small computers), why not make it then fully compatible with globally available consumer devices (TV’s, displays)?

Craig Taylor avatar

Micro HDMI connectors are not as robust. I lose connection and have to jiggle them sometimes. It gets annoying.

Hanif avatar

I’m sure there will be a new case at some point to give you the full size HDMI that you crave.

Reply to Hanif

Sanjin Ganić avatar

Of course it will be, there are always people who know to listen voice of customers and earn on that :) I don’t know what is situation in Western Europe and USA, but in this part of world, if you forget mHDMI->HDMI adapter cable (I am travelling a lot because I am expat), you’re screwed. Because it’s that not easy to find it in stores here – nobody is using that.

Mike Morrow avatar

There are cables with mini and micro HDMI on them so no adapter needed. Easy l, yes. Slight expense? Yes. I don’t find it a bother.

W. H. Heydt avatar

When I travel, I carry a 15.6″ portable monitor. Looks kind of like a giant tablet. It uses USB-C for power and *mini*-HDMI for video input. So with it, I carry a zip lock bag that contains: monitor PSU, USB-A to USB-C (power) cable, HDMI to mini-HDMI cable, and micro-HDMI to mini-HDMI cable. That way, it’s all contained and I’m ready for anything.

Reply to W. H. Heydt

David avatar

UART socket? Eee bah gum! I’ve not seen one o’ those since me old times wi ‘t Z80. Proper tricky it were ‘n all, what with stop bits an’ parity and getting ‘t cable to work wi’ RTS ‘n that. But you try telling ‘t youth of today…

Reply to David

D Smith avatar

Now yor gettin technical Lad with yore bits and stuff – in my day it was two tin cans and a length of wet bailer twine – you younguns dont know how easy youv got it…

Reply to D Smith

aBUGSworstnightmare avatar

Because of the new RP1 I/O chip will there be any impact on existing drivers (CSI/DSI/I2S/etc.)?
Will Pi5 start with Bookworm or Bullseye?

Reply to aBUGSworstnightmare

Liz Upton avatar

We’ll be launching with Bookworm – you’ll be able to download the OS very soon. Keep an eye out here: we’ve got lots of goodies coming!

Reply to Liz Upton

HPCguy avatar

WIll the 32bit armhf variant of Bookwork be supported in PI OS?

Reply to HPCguy

Michael Kelly avatar

Is the I2S still limited to PCM up to 192Khz?

Reply to Michael Kelly

PhilE avatar

There is no impact on existing drivers because each of those interfaces you mentioned gets a completely new driver which, thanks to Linux’s driver models, slot right in.

Reply to PhilE

aBUGSworstnightmare avatar

… but requires a change of existing overlays (i.e. as PWM/GPIOs are no longer part of the SoC because they’ve move to RP1), right?

Reply to aBUGSworstnightmare

6by9 avatar

As long as you’re using aliases rather than explicit paths to nodes, then almost all of those just transfer. There is a slight change around CSI and DSI as each connector now has a dedicated I2C bus, but GPIO, I2S and PWM, should all be the same.

Reply to 6by9

PhilE avatar

Backwards compatibility has been maintained as much as possible – many overlays will work unmodified.

Reply to PhilE

Tovli avatar

My robot used wiringpi to bit-bang clock stretching I2C in bullseye, and not available in bookworm.

Does RP1 implement true clock stretching I2C?

Reply to Tovli

Kainomad avatar

Great specs, great price, great conception, as always but i would rather see another usb-c with display-port alternate mode than 2 mini-hdmi (also would have been great for data) . Also are 2 cameras ports necessary ? Why not use a hat for this and embed a m.2 directly on board or direct PoE compatibility? Or even a SIM card reader ?

Reply to Kainomad

PhilE avatar

For the small board area required, adding the option of 2 cameras, 2 DSI displays, or 1 camera and 1 display is going to be very popular. Adding an M.2 socket would increase the height of the board significantly – you’d have to fit it on the bottom to avoid blocking the fan/ambient air circulation.

Reply to PhilE

Kainomad avatar

I guess I’m not part of the popular kids’ team ;) Thank you for your answer. Great job and great ideas! I really like the PWM, UART/Arm debug and JST additions. Can’t wait to get this baby.

Reply to Kainomad

Gunnar Larsson avatar

Will the raspberry 400 come with a new version as well?

Reply to Gunnar Larsson

Liz Upton avatar

Oo, that’s a good idea. Must mention it to Eben.

Reply to Liz Upton

Alastair Stevens avatar

I run a busy code club at my son’s school in Gloucester, using 15x RPi 400s, which everyone loves. We struggle with the school’s cranky old non-HDMI monitors, but that’s another story. I can envisage a future RPi 500 taking it to the next level! The club resumes today, so I look forward to telling them all about RPi5 first…

Reply to Alastair Stevens

Jamie Whitehorn avatar

+1 on an updated version of the 400, please 🙏🏻
The 400 is my favourite version probably because I cut my teeth on the BBC Micro

Reply to Jamie Whitehorn

Richard Molyneux avatar

+1 from me too, for a Pi 500, and please don’t forget to include media legends (play/pause, fast forward/rewind, etc.) printed on the keys this time; as found on the competition ;-)

Reply to Richard Molyneux

Andrew Kirby avatar

+1 for an update to the PI 400 – but with the M.2 slot inside for storage

Reply to Andrew Kirby

Momo avatar

Please update P400, too. And add an updated soft shutdown / power off option better than FN + F10 for all children and headless clients, please…

Reply to Momo

Liz Upton avatar

I’ll line up a nice shiny pony for you too. ;)

(Please, please do what my toddlers do not do, and be satisfied with the nice thing we’ve done rather than asking for a pony.)

Reply to Liz Upton

Matt Cruikshank avatar

If you give me a way to Pre-Order, and actually pre-pay, I will instantly buy a “Raspberry Pi 500” kit.

Jeff Geerling avatar

Thank you for this comprehensive peek behind the board’s features and development… so many little details about the RP1 and the new architecture—I only hope we can see even more bandwidth and more refinements to RP1 in it’s next iteration. Glad it’s finally seeing the light of day in a real product!

Reply to Jeff Geerling

Alex Ivanovs avatar

Great work, team!

Reply to Alex Ivanovs

Richard Eric avatar

Nice upgrade. Good to see the same footprint. The form factor of the RPi is just about perfect. I had hoped that the RP2040 was going to be added like how the iMX7 has an M4 co-processor. For embedded stuff it’s a big win. But I guess would make the silicon too big or pricy. Maybe next time. ;)

Reply to Richard Eric

PhilE avatar

RP1 and RP2040 are not quite sister chips, but definitely cousins, and RP1 does have some PIO capabilities – something we are hoping to expose to Linux and application code over the coming months.

Reply to PhilE

BrianW avatar

Could you expand on what the PIO capabilities are please?
For me, PIO has been the defining feature of the RP2040, and I was coming to the comments to say I was disappointed see no mention of it in the RP1. I had been hoping that PIO could be integrated into the RPi GPIO, and the RP1, designed by the same team as the RP2040, seemed like a missed opportunity to include this excellent feature, until I saw your comment.

Reply to BrianW

James Adams avatar

RP1 has an internal subsystem that predates RP2040 and is primarily designed for system management purposes. It does have PIO but is not quite the same as RP2040 PIO, we are looking at whether we can put togheter a nice way to expose it without falling over ‘my RP2040 PIO stuff doesn’t “just work” on RP1’ type issues.

Reply to James Adams

Luke Wren avatar

There is one PIO instance (4 state machines). It’s identical to the PIO blocks on RP2040, except the FIFO depth is doubled. It has single-cycle bus access from the dual Cortex-M3 management processors on RP1, and the PIO FIFOs can also be accessed from the host processor (2712) over PCIe, but the PIO configuration registers are only accessible to the RP1 processors.

One of RP1’s Cortex-M3s is currently going spare, so it should be possible to write your own Cortex-M firmware and load it into the 16 kB per-Cortex-M3 private SRAM. There won’t be any software support for this at launch though.

Reply to Luke Wren

BrianW avatar

Thank you, and James too

triss64738 on the forums avatar

That sounds rather nice. Is there any chance the RP1 (or a similar chip) will be released as a standalone? It could be useful for high-bandwidth applications (I myself had almost used the RP2040 for interfacing with a >100Msps ADC, or emulating an LCD screen), but the USB1.1 bandwidth limitations of the RP2040 meant I had to resort to chips >10x as expensive.

DrDnar avatar

That’s great and very exciting information! My first thought when I saw the Pi5 news was, “That thing had better have a PIO block!” I’m glad to see it’s there even if the software support isn’t quite ready yet.
As an embedded software person myself, I don’t think it’s reasonable to expect that RP2040 stuff could “just work” on the RP1. The fact that the RP1 is a chip with very a different purpose not directly connected to the host CPUs makes writing drivers for it a lot different. For example, on the RP2040 you can have very tightly bounded latency between the CPUs and a PIO block, which is impossible to get with the main A76 cores, never mind over a chip-to-chip bus.
I think it’s reasonable (perhaps necessary) to tell people that PIO programs for the RP1 will need to be adapted to work with the Linux kernel. I’m also curious to see accessible main system RAM is from the RP1 and how DMAs between the chips work, as I suspect that’s really going to be what makes or breaks custom high-bandwidth interfaces. I’m guessing you might end up coordinating two levels of DMA: one from the SoC/DDR4 to RP1, and one from the internal RP1 RAM to the PIO block.
I really look forward to reading the documentation on the RP1 when it becomes available!

Chad Page avatar

Does the RP1 support ‘raw’ output to the composite ADC?
I’ve been looking for a good raw composite output for my low-level laserdisc decoder for quite a while now…

Liz Upton avatar

We’re going to be doing an in-depth video about RP1 here some time over the next few weeks: watch this space.

Leah avatar

Oooh, I can’t wait to play with it!

The whole PIO concept is a massive gamechanger. It completely changed how I think about peripherals, and I really dread having to work with MCUs without a PIO in the future.

I wouldn’t be too surprised if someone came up with a chip which had a dozen PIO cores and just dropped all the legacy IP. When you can get the same result by loading a bitstream into a PIO, why bother hardwiring any protocol?

Reply to Leah

Cbj avatar

The write up.mentions the RP1 is designed using principles from the RP2040 so you never know there may be an Easter Egg there…

But yes being able to have some basic microcontroller style watchdog processes running that can kick in the main board when needed, that could be very useful

Reply to Cbj

zal avatar

Very disappointed in 1x PCI Express and an m2 HAT that makes it impossible to fit a proper heatsink and fan. That severely handicaps it in comparison to RK3588 based options such as the Orange Pi 5 Plus. Too bad, I was looking forward to Raspberry Pi matching the competition.

Reply to zal

PhilE avatar

I have a Pi 5 with a prototype M.2 HAT and cooling fan running happily on my desk. I looked up the price of the “competition” and nearly choked on my coffee.

Reply to PhilE

zal avatar

How much did you pay for your Pi 5 and m2 HAT, Phil?
Choke all you want. Not all Pi customers are in the UK – for customers outside your borders the price difference might not be that big, especially not if you factor in the additional cost of an m2 hat.

Reply to zal

David avatar

I just checked the price of the Orange 8GB on Amazon.com. $128 excluding shipping and taxes. Unless you like binary numbers, Raspberry Pi 5 is cheaper by a wide margin, even with $5 for active cooling. And I’m sure we’ll see a $64 bundle for the binarists soon…

Reply to David

Liz Upton avatar

The active cooler is $5, as you’ll see from the post you’re replying to. I’ve just eaten a breakfast croissant that cost more than that; and I can confirm that the cooler is very proper indeed.

Reply to Liz Upton

James Adams avatar

The croissants were very proper too…!

Reply to James Adams

Ben avatar

Don’t ever change, Liz :-)

Reply to Ben

Alasdair Allan avatar

Can confirm that ham and cheese breakfast croissants were excellent value for money!

Reply to Alasdair Allan

Alastair Stevens avatar

Very exciting – thanks for the fascinating article with lots of interesting design details. This really will be another new era for Raspberry Pi, with a machine seemingly powerful enough to serve as an everyday computer (the RPi4 was almost, but not quite, there). I’m already brimming with ideas for RPi5 projects, although sadly the one thing that remains truly out of stock is spare time!

Reply to Alastair Stevens

Dreamcat4 avatar

geez i really hope you guys will be taking it upon yourselved to ensure a spart parts supply replacement of these custom Renesas DA9091 ics. with the 8x smps and 20 amps. otherwise it’s going to be like the rpi4 / cm4 all over again. which was an r2r nightmare. btw speaking of cm4 will there be an equivalient cm5 planned / coming? because that would also be pretty desirable actually.

Reply to Dreamcat4

acquer avatar

If it is always sold out or with extra premiums elsewhere it has no sense to plain users. RPi was a thing.

Reply to acquer

Liz Upton avatar

I’m sorry, what?

Reply to Liz Upton

Camefrom Sirius avatar

Hi Liz, I’ve used AI to help us decode his message. This is the translation:

“If a product is always sold out or only available at a higher price than usual, it does not make sense for regular customers to purchase it. The Raspberry Pi was an example of this.”

Reply to Camefrom Sirius

Liz Upton avatar

Jolly good that he’ll be able to buy one, then. (Seriously: go and pre-order.)

Reply to Liz Upton

maussirk avatar

Will there be also Raspberry Pi Compute Module 5 versions available? – not for industry reason but for my Home Assistant Yellow and there are also other board which use Compute Modules.
I really would like to pre-order …
where is the link?

Dirk avatar

Are there plans to release it also as Compute Module 5?

Reply to Dirk

MW avatar

WoW despite all the crap in the world, RPL have managed to release a massively updated RPi at a great price, be interesting to see how well RPi OS Bookworm performs.

Also finally we have a PD Power, and as usual the price is extremely competitive for a Power Supply.

Reply to MW

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

Bookworm is something we’ve been working on for a while (and I’d like to thank the beta testers who have been feeding back to us, I might have a present for some of you!!!)

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

James Adams avatar

Worth mentioning the PD supply doesn’t just support the 5V/5A mode but also does standard 27W PD modes 9V/12V/15V so can be used as a high quality, low cost ‘generic’ USB-PD supply. Internally has Rubycon and Panasonic caps and uses latest-generation GaN switching tech.

Reply to James Adams

Liz Upton avatar

I’ve been using mine to power my MacBook Pro, which is very pleasing (it’s charging as I type this): it’s nice to be able to eat my own dogfood, and a MacBook Pro power supply costs £79 in the UK, which is a lot more than the $12 we’re charging for ours.

Reply to Liz Upton

James Adams avatar

I probably should have put more emphasis on the fact you are getting a *REALLY AWESOME* power supply for $12!

Reply to James Adams

David avatar

I don’t know exactly which Apple power supply you’re referring to, but mine is 140W and costs about $85 (excl.). That’s nearly six times the power at a bit more than six times the price (as you’d expect from Apple).

Reply to David

David avatar

I don’t know exactly which power supply you mean, but my 140W MacBook power supply costs 7 times more than the Pi for a bit less than six times the power. Still a very impressive achievement for a $12 power supply. Can you say how efficient it is?

Reply to David

Taylor avatar

I wish the Pi itsself had those PD capabilities. I don’t think I’ve seen a power supply that can do over 3A on any voltage under 20V, so having 9V input to the Pi would open the amount of power supplies from 1 to ∞ (ok, not quite)

Reply to Taylor

Andrew Waite avatar

Looks awesome. The micro rather than full size HDMI connectors is disappointing though.

Reply to Andrew Waite

Chris avatar

I will buy the Argon One case that is a brilliant heat sink and puts all ports at the back whilst conveying the HDMI ports to full size ones. Issue solved.

Reply to Chris

Alex Ellis avatar

Congrats to the team, this is a wonderful upgrade for I/O and overall performance. I shared my testing via Twitter, feel free to check out the benchmarks and pictures.
https://x.com/alexellisuk/status/1707296079849365650?s=20

Reply to Alex Ellis

Ian Hollis avatar

Congratulations on hitting a SIX once again.
You folks are feeding my SBC (RPi specifically) obsession. Keep it up. I hope there’ll be sufficient produced to feed the obvious demand which you’ll generate. Perhaps RPi 4s will reduce in price to reasonable. :-)

Reply to Ian Hollis

Sergio Costas avatar

Looks awesome! But about the MIPI connectors… will they be limited to the current screens, or we would be able to connect others? I ask because I have a 1920×480 screen with a dual-MIPI interface (the cable has, literally, two independent MIPI signals), and I was wondering if I would be able to power it directly from the MIPI connectors instead of having to use the current HDMI adapter, which is a nuisance.

Reply to Sergio Costas

James Hughes avatar

The latest graphics stack (KMS) has allowed the use of third-party DSI displays for a while, as long as you have the right driver.

Reply to James Hughes

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

Annoyingly, MIPI is a lot more complex than nice things like HDMI. Even people with experience making displays have trouble getting all the commands and signals exactly correct. Plus in general, you need a £17k scope to debug it!!!

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

aBUGsworstnightmare avatar

Sure it is dual channel MIPI and not dual-lane (as what would be sufficient for 1920x480pixels)?
Also asked the question if RPI offers possibility for Dual-Channel MIPI-DSI; thinking of high-res DSI displays and FPD-Link III Bridge Serializer with Video Splitting (3k/2k) here

Reply to aBUGsworstnightmare

6by9 avatar

No, there is no support for dual interface displays. They are two discrete DSI interfaces, and show up under Linux as two distinct DRM devices.
This is why I commented on the forums about Wayfire handling multiple DRM cards nicely – we’re relying on it here as DSI1/DSI2/DPI/VEC are 4 DRM devices, plus a 5th for vc4. Yes, I have had 5 displays running simultaneously (I didn’t hook up composite). Substituting DPI for an SPI display also works incredibly well.

Reply to 6by9

aBUGSworstnightmare avatar

Thanks for letting us know!
I’m sure prepared to test Pi5 with 5 screens once I can buy one/get it at hands.
Sorry, but I don’t understand the meaning of ‘Substituting DPI for an SPI display also works incredibly well’!

Reply to aBUGSworstnightmare

6by9 avatar

Both 2 x HDMI, 2 x DSI, and 1 x DPI, and 2 x HDMI, 2 x DSI, and 1 x SPI have been tested and work.

Seeing as you can use multiple chip selects and SPI buses, you could create a tiled desktop with multiple SPI displays. Don’t expect a fantastic refresh rate though (I wouldn’t try watching video on it).

manuti avatar

Congratulations to the whole team!!!

Reply to manuti

Simon Monk avatar

A fantastic and well thought out update to the Pi. This is now an extremely good desktop replacement machine.

Reply to Simon Monk

Geoff avatar

What I would like is active cooling + PoE + M.2 support.

Reply to Geoff

Liz Upton avatar

You can do that. As you can see if you read the post you’re replying to, you can stack the active cooler with hats – which will include PoE and M.2.

Reply to Liz Upton

supdude avatar

All the post says is that you can mount HATs on top of the case fan

He is talking about the active cooler, which is not specified in the post if a HAT can be mounted on top or not without the use os gpio spacers

Reply to supdude

James Adams avatar

With an appropriate GPIO spacer and 15mm standoffs you can stack HATs above the Active Cooler – works very nicely.

Reply to James Adams

Ashley Whittaker avatar

You mean like the Active Cooler mentioned in the post?

Reply to Ashley Whittaker

Mehmet Aksoy avatar

Congratulations to all!

Reply to Mehmet Aksoy

Jamie Whitehorn avatar

Congratulations on the new version 🎉
Really pleased to see the inclusion of the new PCI Express connector. Can’t wait to see what the partner community does with this.

Reply to Jamie Whitehorn

Jarom Hatch avatar

Does the USB-C port have USB3 host support now rather than USB2?

Reply to Jarom Hatch

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

No, the USB-C is the same dwc-otg peripheral as before, it’s the most reliable one we have (we’ve now been using it for 12 years)…

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

Michal Tarovsky avatar

Is it a Secure Platform? Will I be able to run Android TV with HW keys for Widevine L1?

Reply to Michal Tarovsky

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

No, it does not have a full TrustZone security implementation. As such it’s not really possible to gain a full Widevine certification.

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

Sean Gilligan avatar

When you say “full TrustZone support” is not present, what is missing? (I’m hoping you just mean the locked bootloader is missing.) Is there (or will there be) documentation about what TrustZone (hardware) support is provided? Is it the same as on the 3/4 or has memory protection been added?

Reply to Sean Gilligan

drich avatar

Did just read somewhere that there is no hardware video encoding, is it true ? That sounds strange as it would means poor performances for real-time applications

Reply to drich

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

Ok, this is a big one… The problem is that video encoding is not a standard. You can put as much or as little effort into encoding as you like, on Pi 1, 2, 3, & 4 the encoding quality (for the bitrate) was relatively poor. The nice thing about using the processors to do this is you get to choose exactly what balance between quality and bitrate you want. Obviously, the bad thing is the power consumption, but actually it only takes around 1 processor to encode 1080p60 with our default settings (which is still better quality than the PI 4 hardware encoder). We think it might be possible with the right settings to be able to hit 4K encode at around 24fps, but we’ve not been optimising in that direction yet.

In future we’ll have to do something, but for Pi 5 we feel the hardware encode is a mm^2 too far.

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

drich avatar

Thank you for the detailed reply.
Surprised that it can be done with only <1 CPU-core for better quality than current implementations, so I will give it a try.
Was afraid because most of the time CPU encoding, even in real-time, adds a few 10's of milliseconds of delay from glass to glass. (I currently have a total of 50ms for a camera→pi4-encoder→wifi→pi4-decoder→HDMI).
Anyway I'm doing all on this on a Compute Module, and when the Pi5 will come in the CM variant there will probably be some optimizations made then.

Reply to drich

ardencaple avatar

Hmm .. remember that for any frame based encoding process, you will always have at least _two_ frames worth of delay in any encode – decode pipeline. You have to collect the incoming frame data (one frame), encode, decode into another frame buffer, wait until the next frame is required, then display the resulting buffer. Even if you had infinitely fast encoders/decoders you cant do better than that. So 50ms sounds OK to me.

Reply to ardencaple

Roger Hardiman avatar

Thanks for the software encoding information.
Are you providing software H264 via the same v4l2m2m interface or just commenting on what happens when you use libx264. Just thinking ahead to my open source projects which use the v4l2m2m API to encode raw video frames and if my applications remain the same (so the new OS still has a v4l2m2m API) or if developers need to change how they encode and start integrating libx264

Reply to Roger Hardiman

Victor avatar

I hate to play the part of mood breaker but I have to admit to be disappointed. Indeed, there have been improvements and RTC is very appreciated but usually there was a much bigger leap in added value in past new Raspberry new major releases. I don’t want to downplay the impressive engineering challenges you faced but I’m wondering if the choice to remain in partnership with Broadcom for SoC worth all this, considering that now the biggest leap is the price and other companies release new boards with more impressive hardware capabilities with much lower efforts. The missing of a modern hardware video encoding is a big missing. A lot of Pi projects involve streaming videos recorded with cam, and often this must be done using wifi, other rf transmission, and bandwidth constraints and compress a video stream in real-time without hardware acceleration is terrible inefficient and infeasible in the case of heavy codecs as HEVC.
Also, many would have appreciated an NPU to make this board more suitable for projects that involves the use of AI. Cpu is improved but not so much and in real world use there isn’t much differences than Raspberry Pi 4. Cortex A-76 is still 4 generations behind the current Cortex-X3 and missing the new vector instructions introduced with ARM-v9. Not having a big-little design also involves the same inefficiencies of previous version for battery powered applications. Some of the lacks force many people to fight with absolutely awful software support of alternative boards.

Reply to Victor

Robert White avatar

The problem is that Raspberry isn’t used only as video player attached to electric line. I personally used Pi 4 on a drone and H.264 hardware video encoder allowed me to encode the camera video to stream in realtime. Using Raspberry Pi 5 in same scenario would consume to much computation resources and drain the battery too fast. I expected to have a better hardware codec as HEVC that now is very common or AV1 for encoding. No hardware encoding at all has been really a bad surprise.

Reply to Robert White

Marcus avatar

Is there any hardware video encoding on the Pi5?

Reply to Marcus

PhilE avatar

See previous answer from Gordon.

Reply to PhilE

Leon Matthews avatar

How exciting for everybody, Congratulations! It makes me chuckle to think of the profiteers still with large stocks of hoarded RPi 4 boards.

Reply to Leon Matthews

Bob avatar

Lots to like there. :D All I need now is to think of a justification for buying one. :D
Have you guys given up on Twitter?

Reply to Bob

supdude avatar

Great news !
Does the new POE+ HAT fit with the active cooler? If it does, does all of that fit in the new case?
Its all about the density !
Hoping to get one as soon as it releases

Reply to supdude

James Adams avatar

The new case has its own built-in fan so you don’t need the Active Cooler. New PoE HAT will fit inside this case.

Reply to James Adams

Aardappeltaart avatar

Great, seems like a BIG upgrade.
Two questions:
– the camera cable, the same as for the Pi Zero2?
– real-time encoding of video, since a HW encoder is missing, in which resolution/codec can it be done?

Reply to Aardappeltaart

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

Yes it is the same cable as Pi Zero (and the display is the same cable as on the CMIO board)… But you can have two of them!!

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

Aardappeltaart avatar

Good news, then I have some around in the house. ;)

Reply to Aardappeltaart

Nicolò avatar

Is the bootprocess still married to the binary blob inside the VideoCore VII, can that be treated as BL0 in the boot process?

A simple Arm M0 inside the RP1 whould have been awesome to offload some IO stuff to it.

Will the RP1 IC available to general public like the RP2040?

Reply to Nicolò

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

There still is a bootloader (to do things like network boot, network install, NVMe boot, USB boot, setting up the SDRAM and possible future easter eggs) it is not encrypted or open source (again due to bits of code which are not ours to release). But once we have loaded the kernel and started the ARMs, it’s only job is to monitor and handle clocks and power, and maybe some encryption key handling for encrypted boot or something…

What is different to all previous devices is that it is all contained inside the EEPROM, there is no longer a start.elf or bootcode.bin required to boot.

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

Petr Falco avatar

Congratulation for a new product! You are really running your own battle with Wayfire, all sort of freshly designed new chips and everything designed with Broadcom in mind. Excellent choice, no need for Gnome, no need for RiscV, all the hackers and tinkerers, please come back and start debugging till the perfection!

Reply to Petr Falco

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

Kind of, although it has been a battle we’ve not won yet. Wayfire is quite limited due to its reliance on a GPU, which means right now we can’t use it for Pi1,2,3 which don’t have an MMU on the 3D block and have to have the big CMA carveout. But we’re rewriting a lot of it to allow us to use software composition for those instead! Hopefully, we’ll be able to move to that over the coming months…

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

Jan Zednik avatar

Dear sir,
I have been using Raspberry since 3b+. Congratulation for you amazing work. So much work has been done on hardware as well as software side.
But since RPi4 I kind of feel it must be difficult to maintain all of the boards. I think RPi4 suffered from backward compatibility of previous devices in term of software support moreover I feel like the Videocore 6 GPU lacked considerable progress since Videocore 4 and Vulkan driver was sort of a work in progress. Keeping software as well as hardware development is in my opinion heavy weight, so why don’t you easy work by adopting pure Debian like Armbian for embedded and Ubuntu for desktop systems or adopting Armbian completely to join forces with their group working on single robust system tuned on multiple embedded boards. I feel Gnome is a standards spread across multiple mainline Linux distributions, de facto standard with future effort focused on being well integrated and tuned under Wayland. I understand those quirky compositors apart from Mutter are fine for variety and evolution, but honestly, mankind would not suffer much from not having them existing. What matters in my opinion is (for desktop use) stable, debugged solution like Gnome on top of Wayland/Mutter, not to mention that you collaborate with all the other distributions on single stable solution saving time effort and resources.You even mentioned Mutter in previous post related to Wayland adoption, so I wonder why such a change to something completely new.
I know I don’t have the inside view of all the work and I my view is completely biased due to lack of facts and information, but I wonder about these questions a lot.

Reply to Jan Zednik

Florian avatar

Hopefully the RP1 is as well documented as the RP2040 (especially the USB controller). When components from other manufacturers were used, they often put the data sheets under NDA, which makes it difficult for bare metal developers like me.

Reply to Florian

Roger avatar

Thank you to all involved people for continuing to provide the world with affordable, and great, computers for us, and our kids, to play with. In a world where “regular” computers gets more and more locked down, making it hard for kids to tinker with, the Pi is a breath of fresh air.

Reply to Roger

mrlinux2u avatar

Well, I wasn’t expecting a Pi 5 till 2024 (was anyone?) but I’m not going to argue – already pre-ordered (along with the fan/heatsink and the new power supply) to add to my collection of Pi models.

Next thing is to design a case for it for my new 3D printer to print (once the technical drawings are available).

Many thanks to the whole team for bringing us the next generation Raspberry Pi (and all the associated goodies).

Reply to mrlinux2u

Ashley Whittaker avatar

SURPRISE! Official case is coming soon…

Reply to Ashley Whittaker

Eddy avatar

You mean other than the red and white with fan (for RP5) official case?

Reply to Eddy

Alasdair Allan avatar

Mechanical drawings of the Raspberry Pi 5 are available!

Reply to Alasdair Allan

adbcode avatar

I am still running the original model B (rev 2) all these years as my first and only RPi. Maybe I can finally upgrade now?!
I was too afraid to experiment with the GPIO pins because you can easily kill the board by messing up some connections. It seems like it will be less likely with the new arrangement.
If you read this, a small request: I hope there is an option to keep the “boot when powered on” behaviour with the new model. It is nice to have safe shut down, but the old behaviour was also handy when dealing with remote deployments.

Reply to adbcode

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

Yes, don’t worry we wouldn’t require a button to turn on, it’s my biggest bugbear with some of my server things at home, it’s always a problem when I have a powercut!

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

adbcode avatar

Haha good to know! Thanks for the confirmation!

Reply to adbcode

Helen avatar

Will there also be a PCIe hat with an open ended PCIe x1 connector where we can plug normal PCIe cards into?

Reply to Helen

James Adams avatar

It’s possible to do this but ‘big’ PCIe x1 connectors require 12V at up to 25W, so extra power supply complexity.

Reply to James Adams

aBUGsworstnightmare avatar

RI1 is the chip where CSI/DSI interface is implemented, right?
Spec and board labeling show that RP1 is able to switch MIPI interface as per user request (2x CSI or 2X DSI or 1x CSI+1DSI). As the interface is 4-lanes each (if I’m not misreading the spec) does this mean we will be able to connect to dual-channel 4-lane MIPI DSI displays in the future -> allowing for high resolution DSI displays?

Reply to aBUGsworstnightmare

6by9 avatar

Answered above, but no they are two discrete DSI interfaces. With each running at up to 1.5Gbit/s/lane it can go somewhat beyond the 1080p60 limit of the older SoCs though.

Reply to 6by9

Brian Beuken avatar

Wow this is exciting, my order is in, can’t wait. Though I am a bit worried about the loss of X11 to Wayland, Ive never quite got my head around that, but I guess this will force some new learning.

Reply to Brian Beuken

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

In the long run, this is going to make everything better across all Pi devices. I am hoping to one day be able to send video images through the operating system directly to the hardware to put onto the screen, no longer converting them From YUV wallpaper mode to RGB tiled to be composed with the 3D into a buffer which might even then need to be converted back to a linear (untiled) mode and then pushed out the display…

My target is 1080p30 in a window on Pi 1

:)

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

Ben Pietras avatar

Wayland has been working great for a while now. I use sway for my daily driver and (aside from using x2go) it works well with everything.

Reply to Ben Pietras

Shivam avatar

This is great news.
Can’t wait to get my hands dirty.

Reply to Shivam

Dale avatar

Having followed these things from the beginning and probably owning 1 if not 2 of most models, I think its amazing how far these little devices have come!
I think there are 2 questions here though:
1) Will there be a RPi500 to replace the 400?
2) from a point of pricing, these are amazing little devices, but they do seem to be stepping away from the affordable devices of a few years ago, even the Zero2 is now 3 times more expensive than the original Zero, will this created accessibility problems or are there plans to fit in an ‘inbetween’ model? Something which gives you most of the ports so all USB/ethernet, maybe only 1 hdmi, less base ram and a few other things less like no pci connector or RTC stuff, to essentially strip out component cost, which still make it a better fully fledged version than a Zero, but more affordable than a flagship?

Reply to Dale

Liz Upton avatar

This is a $5 increase over the equivalent Pi 4 models – we think that’s actually pretty good for a >2x increase in performance and a number of new features, and if you’re particularly price-sensitive, all the predecessor models are still available.

Reply to Liz Upton

Dale avatar

I probably have enough already :)
I guess I was thinking of the fact that in the earlier days when the Zero came out, there was essentially a £5, £20 and £30 model, where the range topper was £30 and that stuff generally held its price well until Raspberry Pi 4, where the ram just seemed to inflate the cost a fair bit. I loved how fully fledged yet cheaply disposable the Rpi Zero was when it was £5.
I have seen you can still get some models some times, do you actually still produce all the earlier models as components become available? I guess everyone always wants more for less dosh these days. I’ve just been quite happy with the Zero, but having lots of extra power gives possibility for so many things!

Reply to Dale

Liz Upton avatar

We do, yes. rpilocator.com is your friend!

Reply to Liz Upton

Sumanta Das avatar

Will there be 16GB model coming?

Reply to Sumanta Das

nafanz avatar

Wow! This is the best news today.

Reply to nafanz

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

And hopefully tomorrow?

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

nafanz avatar

Yes.
I also want to believe that in the near future you will announce a version with 16 GB of RAM and an updated RPi 500.
Then it will be a bomb.

Reply to nafanz

Bouarfa MAHI avatar

Hello,
is there a datasheet available for the Raspberry Pi 5? I need information on the exact positions of the Ethernet port and power button for customizing a 3D-printed case

Thanks

Reply to Bouarfa MAHI

Liz Upton avatar

Not yet, but it’ll be available when the hardware itself is available.

Reply to Liz Upton

PhilE avatar
Stewart Watkiss avatar

Congratulations. Sounds great!
I’ve placed a pre-order already and I’m looking forward to having a go once it arrives through the door.

Reply to Stewart Watkiss

Tally avatar

A great update, looking forward to getting it but one question.
Is the Pi 5 a “proper” Arm PC ?
By that I mean does it have UEFI support out of the box that adheres to the Arm system ready standard so we can use any general ARM64 compatible operating system [similar to x86 UEFI] or is it still limited to uboot and its tailored OS images.

Thank you.

Reply to Tally

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

The bootloader doesn’t support UEFI, it’s a bit too much to fit into the EEPROM along with everything else. I don’t know if there’s a minimal UEFI implementation, but it does seem like UEFI is quite large.

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

M. Mediouni avatar

U-Boot nowadays has a UEFI implementation available. Can you tell the size of the EEPROM? Is it 128KB like previous RPi generations?

Reply to M. Mediouni

James Adams avatar

16GBit (2MByte)

Reply to James Adams

M. Mediouni avatar

I understand that to be 16Mbit instead of Gbit :)

Depending on how much is taken by the firmware, that’s way more than enough space to fit in a U-Boot UEFI-compatible implementation with some ACPI tables (preferably if that PCIe controller is ECAM compliant).

I wonder if Raspberry Pi would be interested by such a project.

Tally avatar

Thank you for the reply.
I understand the limits and price points to get it to ship.
Maybe one day we could see a deluxe Pi 5, with the hardware mounted on a mini-ITX motherboard with all the I/O PCI-e etc and a UEFI bootloader.

Reply to Tally

Lukáš Říha avatar

There actually is a project trying to provide UEFI for Rpi4, https://github.com/pftf/RPi4 . Is larger than current EEPROM size as stated below, but I imagine it could be optimized for size.

Reply to Lukáš Říha

Vojtěch Hron avatar

this is very good i will buy

Reply to Vojtěch Hron

PhilE avatar

Thanks, Vojtěch, this was my favourite comment of the day!

Reply to PhilE

Ignas Kiela avatar

Does RP1 emulate SMI(Secondary Memory Interface) that HATs like CaribouLite use for high-speed data transfer?

Reply to Ignas Kiela

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

That should be possible in the future with a suitable PIO driver. There is a PIO implementation and we’re hoping to develop a nice Linux driver and some userland tools for it. But we’re not there yet!

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

Ignas Kiela avatar

PIO!? You got me very interested :)

Reply to Ignas Kiela

Joe Fongo avatar

Does the power button support instant on/off like a cell phone? Or will the pi still need 30s to boot each time?

Reply to Joe Fongo

PhilE avatar

The power button currently triggers a full boot or shutdown – booting to the desktop is under 30 seconds. In future it may support a low power suspend mode which will boot much more rapidly, but until it actually works I can’t promise it.

Reply to PhilE

thagrol avatar

The only thing instantly powered on/off by your phone’s power button is the screen. Everything else is still running otherwise you’d not be abel to recieve calls.

Reply to thagrol

Giovanni Rito Russo avatar

I know realvnc doesn’t support “Wayland” as I read that debian Bookworm will be released with Wayfire Wayland composer, what system will Pios use? always realvnc with wayland support or other software?

Reply to Giovanni Rito Russo

Liz Upton avatar

Right now we’re recommending WayVNC on the server end, and TigerVNC on the client end. There will be plenty of documentation available around VNC – watch this space!

Reply to Liz Upton

Giovanni Rito Russo avatar

So in raspi-config we will no longer find the active realvnc entry? Do we have to manually install compatible software? in debian 12?

Reply to Giovanni Rito Russo

Gordon Hollingworth avatar

We do have contact with the WayVNC developer but this won’t give the ability to remotely access your Pi as RealVNC does. We’re hoping it will start working, now they have a full example of how to port to Wayland, but it will take time.

Reply to Gordon Hollingworth

Robin Davies avatar

> [WayVNC, doesn’t support remote access like RealVNC does]
I’m hard pressed to imagine what VNC support means if it doesn’t mean supporting remote access.

So is there a solution for remote access to headless device? Specifically, is there a solution for connecting to a headless Pi running bookworm from a Windows computer?

Reply to Robin Davies

Chris Fox avatar

Hmm.. Unlike RealVNC, TigerVNC doesn’t have a Viewer that runs on iOS or Macs with Apple silicon. This is unfortunately a deal breaker for me – just trying to cancel my pre-order…

Reply to Chris Fox

meltwater avatar

Wow the little RPi has grown.
Some awesome features and huge potential for learning, really can’t wait to see what crazy uses we can make of this one. Might have to get back to writing again!

Reply to meltwater

Kumar Abhishek avatar

Awesome, congratulations! This is great and I am looking forward to buy one when it’s available.
I am curious if BCM2712 retains the SMI (secondary memory interface) that was present on the earlier silicon.

Reply to Kumar Abhishek

PhilE avatar
Kumar Abhishek avatar

I read Luke’s comment about the PIO architecture on the RP1 and it seems really interesting! On the Pico, only 30 pins are connected externally to the PIO even though it seems to have 32 pins for itself as per the block documentation in the Pico datasheet. So are all 32 pins contiguously available on a PIO block brought out on the 40-pin header? Just curious – because by default only 28 GPIOs are available on the 40-pin header and I assume you will maintain backward compatibility on the header.

Reply to Kumar Abhishek

PhilE avatar

by default only 28 GPIOs are available on the 40-pin header and I assume you will maintain backward compatibility on the header.

This.

Reply to PhilE

Radek Suski avatar

Cool. Exactly on my birthday

Reply to Radek Suski

Liz Upton avatar

Happy birthday!

Reply to Liz Upton

David Mohring avatar

Will SKUs of the Raspberry Pi 5 with more memory than 4GB & 8GB be available in the future?
If so what ETA?

Reply to David Mohring

PhilE avatar

But that would be an announcement of something we haven’t announced, which sounds like some kind of paradox.

Reply to PhilE

David Mohring avatar

So it is not a no then.
Your being so enigmatic that it seems to hint it even be an option for the Pi 5 version of the Raspberry Pi 400.

Reply to David Mohring

PhilE avatar

No, I just find it strange that people don’t seem to understand how announcements work.

Reply to PhilE

Ashish avatar

This looks awesome! Congratulations to Raspberry Pi team.

Reply to Ashish

Chris Stagg avatar

Congrats on the new flagship!
And kudos on not having the mad dash release.

One question, if the RP1 chip is not available for general release, would there be a pico-esk board with it that uses USB-C/thunderbolt/pcie for connecting to it?

Reply to Chris Stagg

Liz Upton avatar

Hi Chris! It did feel like pre-announcing would give the most people the most opportunity to get their hands on one on day one! As usual, I’m afraid we can’t comment on future releases (apart from the one in the headline), so I’m going to gliiiiide past your question. :)

Reply to Liz Upton

Chris Stagg avatar

After a couple of days, and a bit more comment reading (in multiple forums), I sense hope for RP1’s solo act.

Reply to Chris Stagg

Lee Gibson avatar

Fantastic job guys, great news on the RTC, this was a real bug bear for remotely deployed system that was required to to rebooted every xx days or hours in know down time periods. So many other improvements too!
I use the Pi4 for industrial product development (poettnially at large volumes) and a solution which is incredibly cost sensitive. I use HD video as a key function and my solution does not require much RAM (runs okay on 512MB), but it does need network and masses of connectivity via USB. I could use the Zero 2 from a cost perspective (it will work on that), but lack of network and USB ports makes it non viable. Pi 5 at 4Gb and 8gb prices are great but are too expensive. So bottom line, will we see 1GB and 2GB versions around the Pi 4 equivalent price? And yes I could use the Pi4 for now but eventually Pi will replace and we will be ascending the cost curve by default without Pi5 1GB and 2GB. I appreciate you are stuck between a rock and a hard place trying to be all things to all people, I just hope the hunt for ‘PC use’ status does not overshadow the well connected, low cost credentials that only a Pi with smaller memory offers and always has, in fact it is what it was born for!

Reply to Lee Gibson

Maik avatar

Nobody seems to want to answer the question if there will be a CM5 and when :)
Is it not allowed to give any information about this yet?

Reply to Maik

Liz Upton avatar

We do not comment on future product releases. Apart from the one we’re talking about today. :)

Reply to Liz Upton

Lee Gibson avatar

Hi Liz, does this ‘no comment’ response also apply to my question (the one above this) relating to 1GB and 2GB Pi5’s above as I have not seen any feedback on that?

Reply to Lee Gibson

Gray avatar

This is a really amazing upgrade and I’m really looking forward to trying it out. Side note, when the inevitable CM5 drops a year or so from now, please, please make the new carrier board mount directly to ATX chassis like a VIA APC or similar. The only ATX carriers that came out for the CM4 were £200 cluster boards. I just need the standard one but slightly wider with different hole placement. Literally 5 servers and a desktop in this house running 12 year old CPU’s, waiting for a compelling ARM8 ATX board to replace them with!

Reply to Gray

Doğukan Sahil avatar

I want to buy a product, but I hope you are aware that the stocks you sell to Turkey are generally problematic..

Reply to Doğukan Sahil

Liz Upton avatar

The stock our Turkish Authorised Resellers sell is exactly the same as the stock that we sell in every other country in the world. Who are you buying from?

Reply to Liz Upton

James avatar

Congrats and thanks for the detailed post. With the pleasantries out of the way, as a Model A enjoyer, I am compelled to ask:
Can we get a Model A this time, pretty please? It’s such a neat form factor.

Reply to James

Javier Goldman avatar

First of all, congrats! The pi 5 looks awsome.
Wouldve loved it announced a little later(or earlier), i just got my first pi (4b) and wouldve waited if i had known D=
Still, i find it kinda sad there’s no AV1 decode/encode support

Reply to Javier Goldman

Erwin avatar

Is Raspberry Pi 5 compatible with the current Raspberry Pi Operating System for Raspberry Pi 4?

Reply to Erwin

Alasdair Allan avatar

As mentioned in the post we’re currently working on a new release of Raspberry Pi OS based on the most recent release of Debian, codenamed “Bookworm.”

This new version of Raspberry Pi OS will launch in mid-October, and you’ll be able to download it shortly before Raspberry Pi 5 arrives on the shelves in late-October.

Reply to Alasdair Allan

Lee Gibson avatar

Hi Alastair,
I think the question was, will Pi 5 still run Bullseye?
And further to that, for my purposes will Pi 5 it still run Buster?

Reply to Lee Gibson

Liz Upton avatar

No, you’ll need to be running Bookworm. Promise you’ll like it though.

Reply to Liz Upton

Lee Gibson avatar

Ouch, that’s a killer for long term killer commercial/industrial applications like mine that rely Buster and cannot run on Bullseye or Bookworm (reliant on OMX Player as VLC does do what is needed and probably never will) once the Pi4 and Pi3 are no longer available :(

Liz Upton avatar

You’ve got plenty of time; we’re not going to be discontinuing Pi 4 until at least the 2030s.

James Hughes avatar

Lee, can you clarify why VLC or some combination of FFMPEG et al doesn’t do what you need? OMXplayer can never run on Pi5, so getting alternatives up and running is important to us. You can email [email protected]

Javier Goldman avatar

will current installations be updated? or do we need to do a clean install?

Reply to Javier Goldman

PhilE avatar

Moving from Bullseye to Bookworm will require a clean install even more than the Buster to Bullseye transition. I think it will be less effort to move your customisations across than to upgrade an image in-place, and much less error-prone.

Reply to PhilE

Javier Goldman avatar

is there any recommended way to backup my customizations? kinda still new to this

Mark avatar

Great to see the new raspberry pi 5. PCI express is also very good. I will add an external SSD. I will be using this device for home assistant. Will there also be a compute module 5? Or is that difficult due to a higher power consumption?
Please do something about the distribution, so we don’t have to pay extra because the RPI 5 won’t be freely available in the market.
But nice to see this new chip. Great work.
Best regards,
Mark

Reply to Mark

Liz Upton avatar

Go to your local Authorised Reseller: they’ll all have stock at launch, and most, if not all of them, are taking pre-orders. And they’ll all be selling at the recommended price (but be aware of your local taxes please).

Reply to Liz Upton

boltronics avatar

I wish there was a model with 16Gb of RAM.
Not that it matters. Everywhere in Australia seems to be completely sold out just a few hours after release. I wonder how long it will take to restock?

Reply to boltronics

Liz Upton avatar

It is not released yet: this is an announcement post that you are replying to! Please go back and read more to find out when and where you’ll be able to buy one.

Reply to Liz Upton

boltronics avatar

Thanks. The article says “Units are available to pre-order today from many of our Approved Reseller partners”, and the stores I checked either said “sold out” or “out of stock” (which I took to mean that pre-orders have sold out). OFC I’ll be happy if that’s not actually the case (and yes I’m now on the waiting lists but it’s not possible to put money down like a true pre-order at piaustralia.com.au or core-electronics.com.au).

Thomas Dieckmann avatar

I’m still missing a WLAN connector (U.FL)… When using metal cases, the signal might be supressed. So please produce a Rev.2 with this connector, very soon!

Reply to Thomas Dieckmann

Liz Upton avatar
Sam avatar

Can the RP1 be used as a standalone processor? I.e. in the future, is it possible that an rp2040 equivalent of the RP1 might be released? I only ask because a rp2040 style microcontroller with a camera interface would be amazing 👌

Reply to Sam

Marcin avatar

If connector PCIe 2.0 can be used to connect fast NVME disk? If so, how to design and count performance for such setup? Could we boot from NVMe then? Adapter needed or not?

Reply to Marcin

aBUGSworstnightmare avatar

That’s what the M.2 HAT will be used for.
NVMe boot will be possible for sure.

Reply to aBUGSworstnightmare

PhilE avatar

Yes, the M.2 HAT Eben mentioned will allow booting from an NVME SSD – the prototype works really well.

Reply to PhilE

Satadru Pramanik avatar

Hooray for a new iteration!
I assume the RTC battery fits neatly within the new case?

Reply to Satadru Pramanik

James Adams avatar

Yes it does!

Reply to James Adams

Mike632T. avatar

Just in time for Christmas !!!
Now I know what I want in my stocking this year.

Reply to Mike632T.

Ashley Whittaker avatar

It’s the most wonderful time of the year.

Reply to Ashley Whittaker

Rob Beard avatar

Sounds like an awesome upgrade to the Pi 4, looks like it’s worth the wait. :-)

Reply to Rob Beard

tek avatar

Will PI5 be at Maker Faire in Rome next month?

Reply to tek

Ashley Whittaker avatar

YES! Here is a list of all the events you can get hands-on with Raspberry Pi 5: https://events.raspberrypi.com/experience-raspberry-pi-5

Reply to Ashley Whittaker

W. H. Heydt avatar

Thanks for the list. I see that the Maker Faire that is practically in my back yard–and for which I already have a ticket–will have Pi5s.

Reply to W. H. Heydt

Steffen avatar

Interesting. I’m curious why you didn’t address a huge weak point, being the SD card, by introducing emmc storage?

Reply to Steffen

James Hughes avatar

For the vast majority of people, SD cards are not a weak point, but a useful feature. On the Pi5 the SD card speed has doubled. You will be able to use M.2 SSDs on HAT in the future, you can already USB or network boot if you want.

Reply to James Hughes

Steffen avatar

It’s fine to keep the SD card slot. But it is well known in the home assistant community, that if you run the os on an SD card, the card will inevitably crash. So to not improve on this is pretty crazy to me.

Reply to Steffen

W. H. Heydt avatar

Beside the fact that no storage medium lasts forever, given what has been said, your solution is: Pi5+case+M.2 HAT+*internal* NVMe SSD. I did a quick look earlier and you can get 256GB PCIe3*4 NVMe SSDs for less that $30. Set up that way and the whole unit is self-contained.

Reply to W. H. Heydt

Robert White avatar

Never had an SD crash in many years of use always on. The SD crashes if are cheap or os isn’t properly configured. SD is a a standard with many different quality cards and technologies, some have also trim feature that makes them basically as wear resistant as a SSD hard disk.

Reply to Robert White

CooliPi avatar

I’ve settled on SAMSUNG PRO Endurance cards, because other cards fail at reading (and eventually wear out) because of TLC or QLC architecture after some time. PRO Endurance is MLC. Supports TRIM (lsblk -D shows it can trim) and fstrim -v / can trim it (once a week is sufficient). SanDisk has an equivalent line of SD cards (also MLC). I don’t know which of them is better.

PhilE avatar

I find the removable storage to be a strength, not a weakness, since it allows easy switching between projects and encourages experimentation. The M.2 HAT will provide a higher performance, higher reliability alternative for those who feel the need.

Reply to PhilE

Sly avatar

Exactly! Removable storage is a must. Not only it is more comfortable and allow to easily switch from a card to another to use a different OS image, configuration etc. But also increase the life of the board not forcing you to trash it because of NAND wearing. With more clue of the facts, many people would rather ask for a faster sd card standard (since it doesn’t even support UHS-II that now with SDUC and SD Express is 3 generations old) rather than emmc that would be a step back.

Reply to Sly

Sly avatar

The emmc is not better than sdcard. This is an old myth built on the fact there are a lot of cheap poor quality sd card and a lot of cheap and old SD card reader on the market, not a problem of SD card standard itself. There are sd card with support to trim as SSD and very fast speed, not even mentioning SD Express readers and SDUC sdcard standards. Makes no sense to switch to emmc would be much better using just a newer SD card reader, that can take advantage of faster microsd.

Reply to Sly

Kelli avatar

Ah, it’s too bad there isn’t any analog(ue) audio output on the board anymore. No more simple-build PiPod. Used to be that all that was needed was a small amplifier to boost the audio up from line level to more ‘oomph’ to drive higher-impedance headphones. Now there’ll have to be a DAC as well… and I don’t even know what it’ll connect to for the digital audio.

Reply to Kelli

PhilE avatar

A cheap USB DAC would be the obvious choice, unless you absolutely need all 4 ports for something else (and no hub), or you can’t make it all fit.

Reply to PhilE

ardencaple avatar

It really depends on what you want – there are lots of audio HATs available. A couple of things to remember – the original analogue output wasn’t very HiFi – so if you want quality audio you need something else anyway. Also, if you are just using it as an audio output device, then you don’t need all the processing power of a pi 4/5. The Pi Zero 2W is ideal for this, especially when paired with the rpi codec zero hat, although that takes the combined price up to about the same as a Pi 4/5. Availability of the Z2W is taking a bit longer than promised to ramp up, but should be here soon.

Reply to ardencaple

Tim avatar

Please share cryptsetup benchmark output.

Reply to Tim

Liam Fraser avatar

For Pi4

# Algorithm | Key | Encryption | Decryption
aes-cbc 128b 49.1 MiB/s 75.1 MiB/s
serpent-cbc 128b N/A N/A
twofish-cbc 128b N/A N/A
aes-cbc 256b 42.5 MiB/s 57.3 MiB/s
serpent-cbc 256b N/A N/A
twofish-cbc 256b N/A N/A
aes-xts 256b 82.5 MiB/s 73.0 MiB/s
serpent-xts 256b N/A N/A
twofish-xts 256b N/A N/A
aes-xts 512b 64.5 MiB/s 56.1 MiB/s
serpent-xts 512b N/A N/A
twofish-xts 512b N/A N/A

For Pi 5:

# Algorithm | Key | Encryption | Decryption
aes-cbc 128b 1073.5 MiB/s 1895.5 MiB/s
serpent-cbc 128b N/A N/A
twofish-cbc 128b 122.4 MiB/s 126.7 MiB/s
aes-cbc 256b 869.4 MiB/s 1581.4 MiB/s
serpent-cbc 256b N/A N/A
twofish-cbc 256b 123.6 MiB/s 127.3 MiB/s
aes-xts 256b 1539.2 MiB/s 1530.9 MiB/s
serpent-xts 256b N/A N/A
twofish-xts 256b 126.2 MiB/s 128.9 MiB/s
aes-xts 512b 1347.9 MiB/s 1334.3 MiB/s
serpent-xts 512b N/A N/A
twofish-xts 512b 128.1 MiB/s 128.9 MiB/s

Reply to Liam Fraser

PhilE avatar

Dual 4Kp60 HDMI, dual camera/display connectors, high performance USB3 and PCIe connectors are all very well, but I expected more love for the dedicated UART/JTAG connector – perhaps I’m just odd.

Reply to PhilE

stan423321 avatar

Debugging support is useless until the day you need it [%

Is it compatible with Pico probes? Does it have hardware “intrusion” support, or is it handled by software?

Reply to stan423321

Logan H-D avatar

So long as it remains compatible with the Pi probe, it’ll be a handy addition for any time I manage to completely break many things.

Reply to Logan H-D

James Adams avatar

Yes it was designed to work with with the Raspberry Pi Debug Probe.

Reply to James Adams

pawel avatar

Is it going to replace JTAG from 40 pin connector and has it gdb support? Can you elaborate more what kind of JTAG is it (swd?)

Reply to pawel

Giovanni Rito Russo avatar

Will the official 7 inch Raspberry display work with Pi5?

Reply to Giovanni Rito Russo

Alasdair Allan avatar

Yes, the 7-inch Touch Display will work with the Raspberry Pi, but you’ll need a new Flat Flexible Cable (FFC) as the MIPI DSI/CSI connectors on the 5 are now at a higher density.

Reply to Alasdair Allan

Laszlo Dobrovolszki avatar

Congrats on the new raspberry pi to the whole team. I was waiting for rpi5 for quite a while. And yes, my biggest dream came true with the on board on/off switch! Already pre-ordered two units… :D (pssst)

Reply to Laszlo Dobrovolszki

stan423321 avatar

Hey folks, minor question on the power supply changes. If I connect a 5V 6A barrel adapter I use for other stuff through a barrel/USB-C kludge to a RPi5, how will the experience differ from new official adapter? Is there some USB negotiation involved over amperes, or is that only for volts?

Reply to stan423321

James Adams avatar

You can add a line to config.txt to tell the Pi to ignore the power autodetection and just assume the supply can give 5V/5A.

Reply to James Adams

gz avatar

Did I read that correctly? There is no SATA connector, and the maximum load on USB is actually lower than Pi4. This means a couple of things. The first is that you still won’t be able to connect a standard 2.5″ SSD drive without an active USB hub in between. The second – the lack of a real SATA connector is the performance bottleneck for Pi4. Therefore an old laptop with the SATA and slower CPU will be much faster and responsive that this new Pi, no matter how much faster the CPU will be.

Reply to gz

James Hughes avatar

USB load will be fine if you use our power supply, and we will release an M.2 HAT so you can have a nice fast SSD attached, although I have found the doubling of speed of the SD card interface to make for a very good desktop performance.

Reply to James Hughes

fanoush avatar

SATA is old, NVME/PCI-E is better for the future. Even the 1x line gives NVME speed similar to SATA, definitely not bottleneck.

Well, I secretly hoped at least for two pci-e lines as every nvme ssd has at least two or have at least 3.0 version but one can’t have everything, still PI5 os great :-) I hope at least CM5 will have more pci-e lines exposed.

Reply to fanoush

fanoush avatar

Oh, found out the pci-e line is actually 3.0 unofficially and works just fine in 3.0 mode for nvme so I am happy. ~900MB/s disk i/o is plenty.

Reply to fanoush

Joseph Pierce avatar

That sounds nice but I can get a full blown prodesk for cheaper and it’s faster bigger HHD and more ram

Reply to Joseph Pierce

James Hughes avatar

Interested, please supply a link to this.

Reply to James Hughes

Norman Jackson avatar

James, I suspect your money won’t work in la-la-land.

Reply to Norman Jackson

Jason Jackson avatar

Don’t hog them all! Spill the beans, where can I find some? Although, they won’t be nearly as power efficient as RPi.

Reply to Jason Jackson

Logan H-D avatar

I see a lot of commentators say that the Pi5 supports USB PD. The actual blog post doesn’t mention this, is this confirmable by a Pi Foundation member? Also, how does this new power supply system work with gadget mode? Does the Pi5 even have gadget mode like the Pi4 did?

Reply to Logan H-D

Alasdair Allan avatar

The Raspberry Pi 5 requires a good quality USB-C power supply capable of delivering 3A at +5V (15W) in order to boot. However, using such a supply will restrict the current draw to peripherals. If you are using a power supply that cannot provide 5A at +5V on first boot you will be warned by the operating system that the current draw to peripherals will be restricted to 600mA.

The Power Management Integrated Circuit (PMIC) of the Raspberry Pi 5 implements the USB-PD standard which allows higher voltages and currents to be negotiated via software.

For users who wish to drive high-power peripherals like hard drives and SSDs, while retaining margin for peak workloads, a USB-PD enabled power supply capable of supplying a 5A at +5V (25W) should be used. If the Raspberry Pi 5 firmware detects such a supply, it increases the USB current limit for peripherals to 1.6A, providing 5W of extra power for downstream USB devices, and 5W of extra onboard power budget.

Reply to Alasdair Allan

Logan H-D avatar

The phrasing in this seems a bit odd, would like some clarification. If I have a USB-PD power supply that can supply 12V at 3 amps, am I correct in interpreting that the Pi will *not* increase the downstream wattage? I can understand recommending 5V 5A specifically, that way there wouldn’t be a need to buck the power, but are other voltages just not going to be supported for proper supplying for other devices at full power?

Reply to Logan H-D

Alasdair Allan avatar

Our upcoming 27W USB-PD capable supply can deliver: 5.0A at 5.1V, 3.0A at 9.0V, 2.25A at 12.0V, 1.8A at15.0V. It comes with a 1.2m 17AWG captive cable.

However, you are correct. If you have a power supply that can do 3A at 12V, there will be no increase in downstream Wattage. The Raspberry Pi 5 requires a 5V supply. It will negotiate for 5V at 5A.

Reply to Alasdair Allan

Liz Upton avatar

Mine’s busy charging my M2 MacBook Pro at the moment. Seems to be handling it quite nicely.

Leah avatar

Wow, that’s a huge disappointment. I really did not expect that. I would’ve expected it to be USB PD compliant so that you can just use any regular old power brick.

Being forced to use the official Raspberry Pi wall wart is a huge dealbreaker, in my opinion. I guess I’ll just have to wait for the rev2 which fixes this – just like the USB-C issues with the Pi 4.

James Hughes avatar

Yes, the Pi5 will negotiate for a 5v5A supply, and use that if present (the Official PS will do this as well as other voltages). In the absence of the negotiation,. 5v3A will be used, which is actually good enough for most use cases.

Reply to James Hughes

Liz Upton avatar

Yes, the Pi 5 has gadget mode, just like Pi 4.

Reply to Liz Upton

thagrol avatar

I’d like to have seen more power for USB devices rather than less but otherwise it sounds like a great leap forward.

Reply to thagrol

James Adams avatar

You do get more downstream USB current, 1.6A minimum (if you have a 5V/5A supply).

Reply to James Adams

Nicko avatar

Does the fact that the drivers for the VideoCore VII GPU will be open sourced mean that Broadcom will be publishing full details of how to make the most of the GPU? It would be great to be able to write drivers for off-loading of compute-intensive machine learning inference using the GPU, especially now we have two camera interfaces!

Reply to Nicko

Mike Redrobe avatar

Can the RTC wake/restart the pi after a period of time off/sleeping ?

Reply to Mike Redrobe

James Adams avatar
Alex avatar

Does the new Pi support the standard OpenGL api (non ES)? Anyway, the faster I/O chip, the SOC and the PCIe lanes exposed are very great additions to the ecosystem. I expected a hexacore or an octacore tho

Reply to Alex

Jim avatar

Squeee!!!!! The addition of the M.2 HAT is killing me!
I wasn’t going to get a new RPi right away, but I want this so bad!
Fantastic job to everyone involved!

Reply to Jim

Brent McGee avatar

Can I play Skyrim on this?

Reply to Brent McGee

Jack Chaney avatar

Is there any plan for a Pi-500?

Reply to Jack Chaney

MW avatar

Jeez all this rubbish about CM5 / 500, some people are just not satisfied.

Now an on topic question, will 32bit support be dropped from Raspberry Pi Bookworm OS for the RPi5 ? because it is about time that 64bit is the norm..

Reply to MW

PhilE avatar

If you’re asking whether the 32-bit Bookworm images will also support Pi 5 then the answer is no. If you’re asking something else then you’ll have to clarify the question.

Reply to PhilE

MW avatar

Thank you, yes you have deduced correctly, great..

Reply to MW

Joe Thompson avatar

Many congrats on this mighty achievement….Physical computing and Linux are super important for our students!

Reply to Joe Thompson

Brad Davis. avatar

Quite jovial, but I will still use my Pi 4 for the moment as I have no need for a new one anytime soon.

Reply to Brad Davis.

Jeff Berntsen avatar

A couple of questions about the new power management system:
First, is there a connector or solder pads for an external power button? I could see that being useful for third-party cases. Second, will it support wake-on-lan via Ethernet?

Reply to Jeff Berntsen

PhilE avatar

Yes – there are two through-holes next to the power connector and RTC battery connector.

For wake-on-LAN I think the answer is probably no – the hardware doesn’t make it easy, and we probably won’t get around to fudging it using RP1 software.

Reply to PhilE

solar3000 avatar

excellent
of course, we’ll have to fight our way thru the horde of geeks to get one.
what will I do with the 300 pis I already have….

Reply to solar3000

Meow avatar

Are you considering swapping hdmi for displayport?

Reply to Meow

Masafumi Ohta avatar

Congrats, happy launch to the team! Can’t wait the launch in Japan passing Giteki certification!
And hope to see Eben and Liz in Japan soon.

Reply to Masafumi Ohta

Liz Upton avatar

You too, Masa! Giteki marks coming to a very small computer near you real soon now.

Reply to Liz Upton

Abu Abdulla avatar

Any details on the ISP part, is there any updates on the codec e.g. h265, speed … etc

Reply to Abu Abdulla

James Hughes avatar

ISP is about 3-4 times faster than previous models. No HW encoders – H264 is done in software, and gives 1080p60 at much higher quality than the previous HW encoder. No HEVC HW encoder.

Reply to James Hughes

Abu Abdulla avatar

thank you for the response, no hw encoder means a bigger latency ?
I was hoping to be honest for a better encoders and latency improvement

Reply to Abu Abdulla

Jon avatar

Where’s The SD Card Slot?

Reply to Jon

Liz Upton avatar

Underneath!

Reply to Liz Upton

Andrew Waite avatar

A new Raspberry Pi 5 🎉
Great to see the Pi now as a fan header, on/off switch and a case fan. Disappointing to see the microHDMI ports though. Maybe the RPi500 will have full size HDMI ports?

Reply to Andrew Waite

horace avatar

wow! awesome! exactly what i wished for. :)

i am looking forward to see what kind of pci-e hats will come out (except for the already announced ones).

Reply to horace

horace avatar

oh, and the possibility to connect two cameras is extremely useful for me too. :)

Reply to horace

Roy Chau avatar

Good to hear Raspi 5 is coming!! Thanks Team.
By the way, will SATA HAT also be available? Thanks

Reply to Roy Chau

PhilE avatar

It’s unlikely that we would make one, but nothing to stop a third party taking advantage of the demand.

Reply to PhilE

Lorenzo avatar

I’m very happy to see the RPI5… and I’ve already preordered mine. However, I’m also a bit disappointed:
This is what I was expecting and I didn’t get:
– USB-C instead of the horrible microHDMI (or rather a single full size HDMI)
– At least one USB-C 3.0 port
– At least one Qwiic/STEMMA QT connector
– Color-coded 40-pin header
– An RP2040 MCU included in the SoC

What I’m curious to see in action:
– The cryptography extensions of the A76 MPU
– The PIO capabilities of the RP1 I/O controller

Reply to Lorenzo

Taylor avatar

Genuine question, but why would the Pi need another Pi(co) on board? It already has 40 pins of GPIO like the Pico

(yes, for any pedants I am aware 2040 =/= Pico)

Reply to Taylor

Joshka avatar

PIO basically adds extra protocols that aren’t already there. E.g. the Pi has 6 UARTs (bidirectional), but 28 pins – PIO means potentially an extra 14 pins of UART (whichever direction) without having to dedicate a CPU to bit bang those extra pins (i.e. your app just writes to a memory address).

Same thing applies for I2C / SPI / whatever protocol you want more of. PIO is a game changer!

Reply to Joshka

Lorenzo avatar

Having a real MCU on the same SoC would incredibly expand the capabilities of the Raspberry Pi. You would then have the full power of the A76 MPU for the high level OS and the raw power of the MCU for real-time tasks. This is a setup increasingly seen on industry-level SoC and having it on a RPi would have been incredible.

Reply to Lorenzo

Eduard avatar

I totally agree. There are a usb-c controllers with VESA amb power outage

Reply to Eduard

Gray avatar

– USB-C instead of the horrible microHDMI (or rather a single full size HDMI)
Dual monitor support > specific choice of connector!
– At least one USB-C 3.0 port
Again,. this is an issue of form factor. I don’t think it’s really that big a deal, USB-A to C cables cost no more than a good quality USB-C to C cable.
– At least one Qwiic/STEMMA QT connector
This seems like the kind of thing a HAT is suited for. *Checks* And yes, Sparkfun already make that!
– Color-coded 40-pin header
Oooh, this one I can’t disagree with you on, that is a neat idea. Probably expensive though.
– An RP2040 MCU included in the SoC / The PIO capabilities of the RP1 I/O controller
Isn’t this kind of the RP1’s PIO stuff you mention you’re excited about? If not, hat!
– The cryptography extensions of the A76 MPU
This! So much this! I’m super excited to try it on the Pi 5, and another reason I’m really hoping that CM5 will finally give us an ATX-friendly ARM64 board I can stick in all my PC and Server boxes. Fast LUKS encryption will make desktop use viable for me, as well as significantly improve TLS performance when hosting services on Pi.

Super excited for the Pi 5 to drop so I can get playing around with this stuff, even if it’s not in the ideal form factor for me. :)

Reply to Gray

Lorenzo avatar

> Dual monitor support > specific choice of connector!
I totally disagree. Everything is better that the horrible, horrible micro-HDMI. That was by far the most common complaint of RPi4 and it’s incredible that they persisted with this really bad choice…

>Again,. this is an issue of form factor. I don’t think it’s
>really that big a deal, USB-A to C cables cost no more
>than a good quality USB-C to C cable.
It’s definitely not an issue of form factor, but of capabilities. A fully compliant USB-C port can be role switched and become a USB gadget.

>– At least one Qwiic/STEMMA QT connector
>This seems like the kind of thing a HAT is suited for.
Having a connector on board costs next to nothing and spares the huge inconvenience of a HAT (and would fit in a standard case). The Arduino R4 WiFi has finally got one such connector on board.

– An RP2040 MCU included in the SoC
RP1 has just some limited PIO capabilities. And it would have been nice to have a full and programmable MCU integrated in the SoC.

Reply to Lorenzo

AT avatar

Great to see the announcement! I’m interested in the boost to crypto performance. Might this allow for Raspberry Pi OS to be installed with full disk encryption as standard?

Reply to AT

Geoff Mead avatar

I’ve only just finally got my Raspberry Pi 4B and you go and do this to me!

Reply to Geoff Mead

Harry Hardjono avatar

I guess I just barely dodged the bullet. I’ve been wanting an 8GB Pi, and Pi4 is available! I almost bought one, but then the announcement came just before I go to sleep…
I can wait a little bit longer! 😀🎉

Reply to Harry Hardjono

Ashley Whittaker avatar

One of the reasons we pre-announced! Nice dodge Neo

Reply to Ashley Whittaker

Joe Brampton avatar

Crippled by gigabit, in 2023.. Extremely disappointing.. I was holding out expecting at least 2.5G if not 10G

Congrats, I guess, I’ll be waiting for 2.5G though or better

Reply to Joe Brampton

PhilE avatar

Look at you, you big power user. I’ve honestly never thought “this gigabit Ethernet is so slow”.

Reply to PhilE

Ian Smith avatar

If your workload requires Ethernet throughput above 120MB/s, why are you still using a Pi? Do you how much heat 10Gb ethernet creates? Trying to put 10Gb Ethernet on a Pi sounds ridiculous. Go buy a proper server.
Why not use a USB3 to 2.5Gb Ethernet adapter if you need it?

Reply to Ian Smith

MarekM avatar

Sure 10GbE over twisted-pair (RJ45, cat6/7) is power-hungry as hell, but SFP+ is not that bad – with freedom to choose any kind of module, fiber or copper DAC.

Reply to MarekM

ukscone avatar

I’m sure it’s just a coincidence but it’s been 4229 days since the original Pi was released on February 29th 2012.

if you add all the digits together it totals 17. if you add 5 (pi5) to it you get 22 which if you divide by the number of raspberry pi model classes which is 7 you get 3.142 which is as near as damn it Pi for most purposes. Also
4229 is a prime number.

Reply to ukscone

Jarom Hatch avatar

Apophenia at its finest. :)

Reply to Jarom Hatch

ukscone avatar

Until Christmas ALL Pi5’s are for individual sales. Industry won’t get their hands on them until the new year. Eben mentions this in the blog post

Reply to ukscone

ukscone avatar

Most (All?) Authorised Resellers seem to have stock of Pi4s and getting topped up regularly for at least a couple of months and I don’t think 10/order which Pimoroni (& other AR i’ve checked )have atm is much of a restriction

Reply to ukscone

PhilE avatar

Unless you have a tip-off about a forthcoming pandemic/supply-chain-collapse I think you are being unnecessarily pessimistic about the future supply of Pi 5s.

Reply to PhilE

Giovanni Rito Russo avatar

Will Raspberry Pi TV HAT work on raspberry pi5?

Reply to Giovanni Rito Russo

UK Raspi fan avatar

Why are prices on this site always quoted in US $ ? This is a British product, designed here, made here, and all prices should be listed in GBP £! I could understand them being in Euros when we were still part of Europe but not US $.

Reply to UK Raspi fan

Liz Upton avatar

Ha – we’ve been asked this question since 2011.

We buy components which are priced in dollars. The price of the Raspberry Pi is dictated by the cost of the bill of materials. If we were to price in pounds, we’d be changing the price to reflect currency fluctuations: if we price in dollars, we’re able to keep the price level.

Reply to Liz Upton

John avatar

Hi, What is the list price for Euros, i see 110, which is far more expensive than 80 USD/GBP
https://www.electronic-shop.lu/product/193013

Reply to John

Helen Lynn avatar

The prices of $60 and $80 US for the 4GB and 8GB variants respectively do not include local sales taxes or shipping. A reasonable amount of rounding is also permitted.

Reply to Helen Lynn

John avatar

Yes, USD 80 + tax is approximately GBP 80, EUR 90.
Is there a list price for EUR? Because it could not be 110!
Digikey price imported from America with tax and shipping is only 75 EUR, but they are also out of stock.

rclark avatar

Looks like a nice upgrade. As I run most all of my RPIs headless, the RPI-4 meets most of my needs. However with fully powered and top bandwidth USB 3.0 ports on the RPI 5, I may try this again as a simple file server for example without having to use a powered hub. Interesting to see if it will handle a USB 3.0 OS SSD drive, and a bigger data drive (say a portable HDD) at the same time! Looking forward to getting my hands on a board!
Only downside for the board is the power and active cooling which makes it not as useful for embedded applications. This (to me) moves the board more in the desktop usage direction, although high power robotics projects may benefit from additional processing capability.

Reply to rclark

Anders avatar

I believe that for similar workloads as those that are currently handled by the Pi4, the 5 doesn’t require any more cooling than the 4 does. Or possibly even less.
The extra cooling is for the extra power.

Reply to Anders

Synack net avatar

I second that cooling will only be needed if more power is applied like anything else

Reply to Synack net

rclark avatar

I thought I read the idle amps was higher than the RPI-4?

Reply to rclark

rclark avatar

To that end, I wonder if ‘under clocking’ is available to help with heat when?

Reply to rclark

Miskkie avatar

HEVC and pci-e/m.2. This is fantastic, all I wished for. tytytyty

Reply to Miskkie

Jared avatar

Will there be an easy way to do M2+PoE? I know that would help me a ton :)

Reply to Jared

AV1 enjoyer avatar

Still no AV1? Disappointed.

Reply to AV1 enjoyer

AnD avatar

Congratulations on this interesting new product!
Thanks.

Reply to AnD

Fred Smith avatar

I’m using a Pi4 as a “network bridge”, and while it works fine, the network (WIFI) thruput isn’t as good as I had hoped. So, I’m wondering two things:
1. would a Pi5start (and run correctly with access to the new features) if I took the SD card from a PI4 and stuck it into the Pi5?
2. it sounds as if USB and networking are still faster on the Pi5. since my current application depends on good fast access to WIFI, would it be expected to see any performance improvement?
oh, and 3: any suggestions on how I can convince my accountant (spouse) that I REALLY, REALLY NEED a new Pi5 ? :)

Reply to Fred Smith

Blueberry Tart avatar

I’d pay extra for a 16GB model. I’m also wondering how much engineering is required to build an same size RPi with expandable RAM.

Reply to Blueberry Tart

John Lytle avatar

It would be nice to have a terminal block to hook up 12/24VDC.
Wall worts are a waste!
Especially if you’re using the Pi for 3D printing where you have lots of Watts.

Reply to John Lytle

Adam V. Steele avatar

What steps, if any, are being taken to ensure ample supply in the few years after launch?

My company (a small business making scientific instruments) invested some significant time verifying compatibility of the 4B with our hardware. Then, when I was ready to move to production I could not buy 4B’s (8 GB esp) anywhere.

I cannot invest in this platform if the hardware is not going to be readily available.

Reply to Adam V. Steele

Anthony R. King avatar

How sweet of you to reserve the first batches for individual purchasers. I wish you every success with matching demand. Do you have any possibilities for increased production should there be sufficient demand?