Summer at the Raspberry Pi Store with The Centre for Computing History

A whole lot of super free hands-on activities are happening at the Raspberry Pi Store this summer.

We have teamed up with the Centre for Computing History to create an interactive learning space that’s accessible to all ages and abilities. Best of all, everything is free. It’s all happening in a big space new space we’ve borrowed a few doors down from the Raspberry Pi Store in the Grand Arcade in Cambridge, UK.

What is Raspberry Pi doing?

Everyone aged seven to 107 can get hands-on and creative with our free beginner-friendly workshops. You can make games with Scratch on Raspberry Pi, learn simple electronics for beginners, or get hands-on with the Raspberry Pi camera and Python programming.

Learners of all ages can have a go

If you don’t know anything about coding, don’t worry: there are friendly people on hand to help you learn.

The workshops take place every Monday, Wednesday and Friday until 3 September. Pre-booking is highly advisable. If the one you want is fully booked, it’s well worth dropping by if you’re in the neighbourhood, because spaces often become available at the last minute. And if you book and find you can no longer come along, please do make sure you cancel, because there will be lots of people who would love to take your space!

Book your place at one of our workshops.

Not sure what you’re doing? We can help!

What is the Centre for Computing History doing?

Come and celebrate thirty years of the World Wide Web and see how things have changed over the last three decades.

This interactive exhibition celebrates the years since Tim Berners-Lee changed the world forever by publishing the very first website at CERN in 1991. You can trace the footsteps of the early web, and have a go on some original hardware.

centre for computing history web at 30
So much retro hardware to get your hands on

Here are some of the things you can do:

  • Browse the very first website from 1991
  • Search the web with Archie, the first search engine
  • Enjoy the very first web comic
  • Order a pizza on the first transactional website
  • See the first webcam site
  • See a recreation of the trailblazing Trojan Room Coffee Cam

But I don’t live near the Raspberry Pi Store!

While we would love to have a Raspberry Pi store in every town in every country all over the world (cackles maniacally), we are sticking with just the one in our hometown for now. But we make lots of cool stuff you can access online to relieve the FOMO.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation’s livestreamed Digital Making at Home videos are all still available for young people to watch and learn along with. You can chat, code together, hear from cool people, and see amazing digital making projects from kids who love making with technology.

Taking a scroll through our FutureLearn courses

There are also more than thirty Raspberry Pi courses available for free on FutureLearn. There’s something for every type of user and level of learner, from coders looking to move from Scratch to Python programming, to people looking to start up their own CoderDojo. Plus tons of materials for teachers sharing practical resources for the classroom.

Raspberry Pi books

If you like to tinker away in your own time, there are loads of books for all abilities available from the Raspberry Pi Press online store. The Official Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Guide comes in five languages. Game designers can Code the Classics. And fashion-forward makers can create Wearable Tech Projects.

More books than the library in Beauty and the Beast

4 comments

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Just a note that the Trojan Room Coffee Cam was originally on an ARM Based Acorn Archimedes and an old relative of the PI

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I’m interested in the events offered by the Raspberry Pi Store. Is it possible to stream the events live so people all over the world can enjoy them too?

Helen Lynn

Our store events are designed for participants in the venue, but check out our FutureLearn courses and our Digital Making at Home resources, which are designed for people to take part from wherever they are.

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Sounds just like the Lego store of my youth… us Americans need one too!

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